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streetbeastINC.
PostPosted: Mon Jul 28, 2014 12:46 pm 
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What is Ebola?

Ebola virus disease, which used to be called Ebola haemorrhagic fever, was named after the river in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, where one of the first two villages to report cases in 1976 was located. The other was in Sudan. Ebola is a severe viral illness with a sudden onset that comes from direct contact with infected living or dead rainforest animals, including chimpanzees, gorillas, monkeys, fruit bats, forest antelope and porcupines. It kills up to 90% of those who are infected.

How is it transmitted?

The virus is passed from one human to another, carried in blood and bodily fluids and secretions, but also beds, sheets, clothes or other surfaces that a sick person has touched. Burial ceremonies that involve touching the body are also a risk. The virus enters the body through broken skin or mucous membrane.The group at highest risk are health workers, caring for those with Ebola. They have to wear full protective clothing, including facemasks and goggles, and should change their gloves between one patient and the next.

What are the symptoms?

The early signs are sudden fever, intense weakness, muscle pain, headache and a sore throat. Vomiting and diarrhoea follow, raising the chances that the sick man or woman will infect somebody else. The kidney and liver are affected and there can be both internal and external bleeding, which is why it was originally called Ebola haemorrhagic fever. Patients are infectious once the symptoms show, which is two to 21 days after they have contracted the virus.

What is the treatment?

There is very little treatment. Patients will need intensive supportive care, with intravenous fluids or oral rehydration salts. They must be kept in isolation and their nurses and visitors must wear full protective suits. If people are to be nursed at home, their carers need instructions and equipment to safeguard themselves. There are no drugs to treat the disease or vaccine to prevent it, although research on a vaccine is under way.

Why is there no cure?

It has proved very hard to find drugs to treat viral diseases from animals, from influenza to HIV. Although the death rate is high, outbreaks of ebola are infrequent and have so far been contained each time. As with many of the so-called neglected tropical diseases, there is not a potentially lucrative market for drug companies, so they will be reluctant to invest in research and development.

If outbreaks can be contained and brought to a halt with good infection control, why do they return?

They can be contained in human populations but the viral reservoir still exists in animals. There will always be a risk that hunters will kill infected animals or that people will pick up those that have died of the infection in the forest and the virus will be reintroduced to the human population.

Will closing borders help?

Containment is key to the strategy against ebola. Quarantine has been used in some outbreaks for the relatives of people who become sick. Because people are not infectious until they become obviously ill, it should in theory be possible to focus efforts on the community where the outbreak began. In the past, that has usually been villages in close proximity to rainforests.Confirmation of a case in a city such as Lagos is a real concern, but transmission must involve direct contact with a sick individual, so is more likely in a family setting or a hospital. The biggest worry is probably that somebody showing symptoms will be taken to hospital where nursing staff are unprotected, because the disease is not recognised, sparking an outbreak that spreads to their families in turn.Closing borders may not help keep the disease out because borders are permeable in much of Africa. The World Health Organisation says closures may hinder travel and trade without detecting cases.

Is the rest of the world threatened by ebola?

Clearly somebody infected with the virus could theoretically get on a plane and spark an outbreak – probably in a hospital – anywhere in the world. However, as with the Mers virus, which arrived in London via a patient who was taken to St Thomas' hospital, infection control measures are so stringent in more affluent countries that it is probable the virus would be very rapidly contained.Tags: Health, Microbiology, Nigeria, Guinea, Africa, more…


Last edited by streetbeastINC. on Thu Oct 02, 2014 3:23 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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streetbeastINC.
PostPosted: Mon Jul 28, 2014 12:51 pm 
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Whats worrying...the fruit bat that is host and vector is native to Trinidad, the facts of modes of transmission is still questionable by experts......this is past serious


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DFC
PostPosted: Mon Jul 28, 2014 12:52 pm 
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better scratch Africa off my Travel list.
Oh and China too ( plague)

Ukraine/Russia- ( unrest)

Avoiding Middle East completely.


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streetbeastINC.
PostPosted: Mon Jul 28, 2014 12:53 pm 
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streetbeastINC.
PostPosted: Mon Jul 28, 2014 12:56 pm 
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Outbreak in africa no longer contained, probable initial cause can be linked to consuming fruit bat soup delicacy in africa


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want2liqur
PostPosted: Mon Jul 28, 2014 1:08 pm 
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Fruit bat soup yuh say inno lol


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speedmelter
PostPosted: Mon Jul 28, 2014 1:11 pm 
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who needs a WW3 when there is this


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streetbeastINC.
PostPosted: Mon Jul 28, 2014 1:39 pm 
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Yup just as here in trinidad ,they eat, manicou, armadillo howler boa, note some of these natural reservoirs of lepto and other serious diseases


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meccalli
PostPosted: Mon Jul 28, 2014 9:33 pm 
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^leprosy(carriers) in dey tattoo lol.


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Gladiator
PostPosted: Mon Jul 28, 2014 9:42 pm 
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This is some scary crap yes... Ebola has the capabilities of infecting and exterminating massive amounts of people.


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streetbeastINC.
PostPosted: Tue Jul 29, 2014 1:44 am 
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Mass deaths within human pop. The main us doctor who wnet into treat patients....is now infected,...delay in symptom manifestaion is posing a new risk...potential outbreak of biblical proportions...some researchers predict airborne transmission mutation probability


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Ted_v2
PostPosted: Tue Jul 29, 2014 5:08 am 
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Contagion and worldwar z

Think about it!!


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mark2.0
PostPosted: Tue Jul 29, 2014 5:33 am 
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The worst Ebola outbreak in history has put a number of countries in West Africa in lockdown, led to the deaths of nearly 700 people since February and brought new reports of doctors, including Americans, contracting the virus they are attempting to contain. The situation is undeniably scary. Here's what you need to know


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DVSTT
PostPosted: Tue Jul 29, 2014 6:02 am 
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Extremely frightening especially for someone entering the medical field...


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shogun
PostPosted: Tue Jul 29, 2014 6:04 am 
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streetbeastINC. wrote:
Yup just as here in trinidad ,they eat, manicou, armadillo howler boa, note some of these natural reservoirs of lepto and other serious diseases


meccalli wrote:
^leprosy(carriers) in dey tattoo lol.


People don't understand that you are what you eat.... so if you eat anything, you can get anything.

That new ebola outbreak is worrying though.


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streetbeastINC.
PostPosted: Tue Jul 29, 2014 12:46 pm 
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I am sure within the next two weeks we are going to see thismleaving africa, remember the incub. Period may be up to two weeks.


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streetbeastINC.
PostPosted: Tue Jul 29, 2014 12:49 pm 
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So a person may be walking around, with it...the us doc who contracted it when he first fell ill even tested negative, it was when he got worst, the serotype showed in the test


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shogun
PostPosted: Tue Jul 29, 2014 12:52 pm 
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streetbeastINC. wrote:
I am sure within the next two weeks we are going to see thismleaving africa, remember the incub. Period may be up to two weeks.



Can be up to 21 days.


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pioneer
PostPosted: Tue Jul 29, 2014 12:53 pm 
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Keep it across there plz.


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kM_89
PostPosted: Tue Jul 29, 2014 1:01 pm 
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Yeah once it stays in Africa we're g2g


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streetbeastINC.
PostPosted: Tue Jul 29, 2014 1:04 pm 
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Alot of causes of transmission up there, is based on cultural acceptance of medicine vs the local shaman....so lets hope theoretically mordern medicine independent of african culture, can arrest the disease if it leaves the endemic area


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shogun
PostPosted: Tue Jul 29, 2014 11:25 pm 
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Lets hope there's no antigenic drift with the virus over time as well... because looks like ebola isn't going anywhere for a while.


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streetbeastINC.
PostPosted: Wed Jul 30, 2014 12:03 am 
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Mutations for transmission airborne human to human may have occured already


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RASC
PostPosted: Wed Jul 30, 2014 6:48 am 
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This is becoming beyond scary at this point.


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shogun
PostPosted: Wed Jul 30, 2014 7:04 am 
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Sheikh Umar Khan fought on the front lines against Ebola and is credited with treating more than 100 victims


Sierra Leone’s top Ebola doctor, Sheikh Umar Khan on Tuesday died from complications of the disease. His death came just days after three nurses who worked with him perished.

Khan served on the front lines of what is now considered the worst Ebola outbreak in history, with 670 dead, primarily in West Africa. He is credited with treating more than 100 victims and has previously been hailed as a national hero. Now, hundreds of condolences are pouring in on Twitter, praising his courage and altruism.

“Khan’s death is yet another recognition that health workers is the group most at risk,” Tarik Jasarevic, a spokesman with World Health Organization, tells TIME. More than 100 health workers have contracted the virus since the beginning of the outbreak and around half of them have died. “This is the first time most of these workers face such an outbreak. We have to equip them with protective gear and train them on how to use it. We also need to make sure there are enough workers. If they work reasonable shifts they can focus not only on the patients, but also on themselves.”

Sierra Leone is the country that has been worst hit by the latest outbreak, but neighboring Liberia is also struggling since the contagion breached its borders. The country’s overland border crossings have been closed since Sunday, and Doctors Without Borders reports that they are only able to provide limited technical support to Liberia’s Ministry of Health and Social Welfare.

The fear is now that the deadly disease could also spread far beyond West Africa, possibly via air travelers. Medical services across Europe are on high alert because of the outbreak, and U.K. Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond told the BBC that the disease is a “threat” to his country.
“There is a risk that the epidemic will spread, but first of all we need to stop it on the ground,” says Jasarevic. “We know exactly what needs to be done, but it requires a lot of resources.”

“We need more treatment centers and experts on the ground, and we need to communicate to communities and families to bring their victims to the centers as quickly as possible in order to increase their chance of survival. We need surveillance systems, safe transports for victims and equipment to carry out burials in a safe way.”

One small bit of good news: The current outbreak has proven to be less deadly than previous strands of the disease. Instead of a 90% mortality rate, 60% of the infected have died. And in some areas in Guinea, the situation has stabilized, with Doctors Without Borders even closing one of its Ebola treatment centers.

The battle against the contagion continues, even if now with one less of its premier soldiers.

http://time.com/3057153/sierra-leones-t ... ing-virus/


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streetbeastINC.
PostPosted: Wed Jul 30, 2014 8:53 am 
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No mention of how it was spread to the workers , taking into consideration they take all precautions and preventative steps ,alarming concerns into the spread of this can be easier contracted than previously thought....i feel it is airborne now.


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DFC
PostPosted: Wed Jul 30, 2014 9:13 am 
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a group of Nigerian and Uganda people coming next week to work by us.

:( :( :( :agrue: :bad-words: :crazyeyes: :shocked!:


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Allergic2BunnyEars
PostPosted: Wed Jul 30, 2014 9:37 am 
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streetbeastINC. wrote:
Mutations for transmission airborne human to human may have occured already


Based on?


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DrunkenMaster16
PostPosted: Wed Jul 30, 2014 9:38 am 
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DFC wrote:
a group of Nigerian and Uganda people coming next week to work by us.

:( :( :( :agrue: :bad-words: :crazyeyes: :shocked!:


Call in sick / RIP.


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streetbeastINC.
PostPosted: Wed Jul 30, 2014 12:31 pm 
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Based on transmission trends observed


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