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Turbo surge just before BOV releases

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Tired Accord
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Turbo surge just before BOV releases

Postby Tired Accord » January 23rd, 2014, 12:28 pm

I have a look-a-like Tial installed on my sr20ve+t setup (with gt28rs). The BOV is installed just after the turbo, before the IC and MAF, etc. On low to stock boost (up to ~7 lbs) - I get the same thing to increasing degrees: a short bit of surge occurs before the BOV actually releases. I don't think it has to do with the BOV itself - as I had used it before on stock gtir DET and never got any surge.

Any ideas?

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Re: Turbo surge just before BOV releases

Postby wagonrunner » January 23rd, 2014, 2:11 pm

does the gtir use a MAF or MAP (VAF) sensor?

wikituning.
MAP sensors measure absolute pressure. Boost sensors or gauges measure the amount of pressure above a set absolute pressure. That set absolute pressure is usually 100 kPa. This is commonly referred to as gauge pressure. Boost pressure is relative to absolute pressure - as one increases or decreases, so does the other. It is a one-to-one relationship with an offset of -100 kPa for boost pressure. Thus a MAP sensor will always read 100 kPa more than a boost sensor measuring the same conditions. A MAP sensor will never display a negative reading because it is measuring absolute pressure, where zero is the total absence of pressure (it is possible to have conditions where negative absolute pressure can be observed, but none of those conditions occur in the air intake of an internal combustion engine[citation needed]). Boost sensors can display negative readings, indicating vacuum or suction (a condition of lower pressure than the surrounding atmosphere). In forced induction engines (supercharged or turbocharged), a negative boost reading indicates that the engine is drawing air faster than it is being supplied, creating suction. This is often called vacuum pressure when referring to internal combustion engines.
In short: most boost sensors will read 100 kPa less than a MAP sensor reads. One can convert boost to MAP by adding 100 kPa. One can convert from MAP to boost by subtracting 100 kPa.

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Tired Accord
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Re: Turbo surge just before BOV releases

Postby Tired Accord » January 28th, 2014, 8:57 am

Wagon it uses a MAF. How is that relevant though?

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