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Leaving Trinidad for good...

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Redman
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Re: Leaving Trinidad for good...

Postby Redman » May 5th, 2019, 11:12 am

If you don't work yourarse off...you don't succeed...anywhere.

Pick what's important to you and go.

You can get knifed in England,Shot in the US eaten by anything Australian, Earthquaked,tsunamied in SE Pacific,Mosques in New Zealand,Blown up,burned,run over anywhere in Europe.

No place is a bed of roses....unless you create the bed of roses.

Decide what's important to you and yours..then commit.

ETA:

I'm outside my parents house over hearing a conversation between two carpenter/mason s next door....one is talking about his 2 kids in UWI.

No place is perfect
Last edited by Redman on May 5th, 2019, 11:18 am, edited 2 times in total.

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shake d livin wake d dead
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Re: Leaving Trinidad for good...

Postby shake d livin wake d dead » May 5th, 2019, 11:14 am

agent007 wrote:BoostLord, so what happens after 2yrs? People have to do refreshers? If so this reminds me of CompTIA and their money making move.

Question, does Canada recognize T&T degrees and work experience etc?


To a certain extent they accept our stuff, I know a dentist who has to do board exams and meet their standards before being accepted..She has 6 years experience here...

If you going with another language as your skill, you will need internationally recognized certs not local...example spanish...CLL courses only good for (maybe) the caribbean...one must do the DELE exams which is tested from Spain...if you have stuff from them, yuh gt

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shake d livin wake d dead
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Re: Leaving Trinidad for good...

Postby shake d livin wake d dead » May 5th, 2019, 11:24 am

shake d livin wake d dead wrote:
agent007 wrote:I heard to go Canada you have to be young, educated and you must pass some UWI English exam to be invited into their country. I also heard that hundreds of people sit the exam each month, the majority of which are doing so to enter Canada (and it not cheap, think it’s like $2k per exam). Lastly, I was told the main thing is French. Once you could speak French you GT. But winter time up there different, it can get so cold, it’s like getting stabbed repeatedly with knives.


The english exam is known as IELTS...offered at CLL and is hard AF...Im in the process of doing it cuz Canada is on my list...but im finishing meh spanish first....if a person did english for academic purposes @ uwi, it's a good start for IELTS...

questions I got when starting the canada process were:

Highest form of education
The instiution
Married
Average salary per mth
Average savings figure
Why canada


They also stated that you would need to have enough $$ saved to sustain yourself for a few months until you get a job

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Re: Leaving Trinidad for good...

Postby TheBoostLord » May 5th, 2019, 11:44 am

shake d livin wake d dead wrote:
agent007 wrote:I heard to go Canada you have to be young, educated and you must pass some UWI English exam to be invited into their country. I also heard that hundreds of people sit the exam each month, the majority of which are doing so to enter Canada (and it not cheap, think it’s like $2k per exam). Lastly, I was told the main thing is French. Once you could speak French you GT. But winter time up there different, it can get so cold, it’s like getting stabbed repeatedly with knives.


The english exam is known as IELTS...offered at CLL and is hard AF...Im in the process of doing it cuz Canada is on my list...but im finishing meh spanish first....if a person did english for academic purposes @ uwi, it's a good start for IELTS...

questions I got when starting the canada process were:

Highest form of education
The instiution
Married
Average salary per mth
Average savings figure
Why canada



I actually found the exams to be very easy tbh. if you passed cxc english and can speak + write well then no prob

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Re: Leaving Trinidad for good...

Postby Dada 4 » May 5th, 2019, 12:48 pm

I've been visiting this site for several years and decided to register to post a reply to this issue after reading it today.

I grew up in Trinidad and immigrated to Canada some 28 years ago when I was 8. My mom was a registered nurse and dad a factory worker in usine in Trinidad. Here's my experience....

My parents struggled and sold everything, came as refugees and lived in a basement apartment with my sister and I for years. . My mom had to go back to school to up her education to Canadian standards and dad struggled working in a cabinet factory at minimum wage. My sister and I went though the education system here and assimilated into Canadian culture. We were young enough to do so. My parents eventually bought a home in york region, and we were lucky enough to both get post secondary education and good government jobs. Got married, bought properties and excelled financially. I drive my kids to soccer practices, art classes and vacation twice a year and live a pretty good life.

When I reflect back now I always missed trinidad and when we would visit it was always fun, but life went on without us and the memories faded and the connection grew less and less. My parents being older never really accepted Canada as a home, they always felt like visitors, they would long for trinidad but now the drastic change in culture has them feeling like visitors when they return. They paid off there mortgage and are now retired. They visit different countries and enjoy what's left of their life. They have heart felt memories of missing trinidad, their friends ahve passed and new family members are strangers to them and only known by name. They do not regret leaving, but do have a strong connection to their homeland.

The reality is the competition for well paying jobs, especially in the Toronto, GTA area is fierce. Immigrants from all over, ambitious students etc. There are well paying jobs with perks, but they are tough to get and excell in. My wife and I make a combined gross income of 160k per year, and that allows us to live in a nice area ( york region), we have a savings, some post secondary education money for our two kids and I drive a ten year old corolla. Thats what that amount gets you.

If you want my humble opinion, if you immigrate here you'll have to struggle, yourself and probally find work at 40k per year to start. It will take time to establish yourself. It will be hard, stressful and frustrating. But your kids will reap the benefit and have the oppurtunity to be whatever they want to be in life. Canadians are very accepting ( there's always ignorant people) and you will be in a safe country with a miserable winter where you feel isolated from life at certain points. If you are willing to swing a mop and a bucket in a hospital, you'll make 25 and hour plus benefits and a little money for retirement after 30 years. Life is expensive here and the taxes are crazy, that's how free health care is sustained.


This is just my experience and I wish yourself and family the best of luck.

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Re: Leaving Trinidad for good...

Postby zoom rader » May 5th, 2019, 1:27 pm

^^^ Good write up bro

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Re: Leaving Trinidad for good...

Postby TheBoostLord » May 5th, 2019, 3:48 pm

Dada 4 wrote:I've been visiting this site for several years and decided to register to post a reply to this issue after reading it today.

I grew up in Trinidad and immigrated to Canada some 28 years ago when I was 8. My mom was a registered nurse and dad a factory worker in usine in Trinidad. Here's my experience....

My parents struggled and sold everything, came as refugees and lived in a basement apartment with my sister and I for years. . My mom had to go back to school to up her education to Canadian standards and dad struggled working in a cabinet factory at minimum wage. My sister and I went though the education system here and assimilated into Canadian culture. We were young enough to do so. My parents eventually bought a home in york region, and we were lucky enough to both get post secondary education and good government jobs. Got married, bought properties and excelled financially. I drive my kids to soccer practices, art classes and vacation twice a year and live a pretty good life.

When I reflect back now I always missed trinidad and when we would visit it was always fun, but life went on without us and the memories faded and the connection grew less and less. My parents being older never really accepted Canada as a home, they always felt like visitors, they would long for trinidad but now the drastic change in culture has them feeling like visitors when they return. They paid off there mortgage and are now retired. They visit different countries and enjoy what's left of their life. They have heart felt memories of missing trinidad, their friends ahve passed and new family members are strangers to them and only known by name. They do not regret leaving, but do have a strong connection to their homeland.

The reality is the competition for well paying jobs, especially in the Toronto, GTA area is fierce. Immigrants from all over, ambitious students etc. There are well paying jobs with perks, but they are tough to get and excell in. My wife and I make a combined gross income of 160k per year, and that allows us to live in a nice area ( york region), we have a savings, some post secondary education money for our two kids and I drive a ten year old corolla. Thats what that amount gets you.

If you want my humble opinion, if you immigrate here you'll have to struggle, yourself and probally find work at 40k per year to start. It will take time to establish yourself. It will be hard, stressful and frustrating. But your kids will reap the benefit and have the oppurtunity to be whatever they want to be in life. Canadians are very accepting ( there's always ignorant people) and you will be in a safe country with a miserable winter where you feel isolated from life at certain points. If you are willing to swing a mop and a bucket in a hospital, you'll make 25 and hour plus benefits and a little money for retirement after 30 years. Life is expensive here and the taxes are crazy, that's how free health care is sustained.


This is just my experience and I wish yourself and family the best of luck.


Well said buddy. This is sure to help some persons with their decision.

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Re: Leaving Trinidad for good...

Postby Dada 4 » May 5th, 2019, 6:12 pm

Thank-you brother. I was hesitant to post my experience as I didn't want it to come across as bragging about salary or my life as it wasn't my intent. When I saw the origin post it reminded me of the frustration he or she must be struggling with, the same frustration as my parents did many decades ago. How does one make a decision to "end their life as they know". Which is essentially what a person or family making this decision is doing. I haven't been back to trinidad for a while, I brought my wife (girlfriend at the time) back to meet my family in 2000. When I went "back home" I would look at the people, the homes, the roads, the cane fields in prince's town and always wonder who I would be, what job I would have, what spouse I would end up with and where my life would be if I didn't leave as a child. It was very nostalgic and at times over whelming. When I would visit people or parts of trinidad I had memories of it made Part of me still still does even to this day.

I watch YouTube videos and ig feeds of trini food, culture etc and still feel that I wish I was there after all these years. To sum it up, if you do decide to leave you're not just leaving a country, you are leaving a part of yourself soul behind.

I miss doubles being readily available in the morning.

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Re: Leaving Trinidad for good...

Postby vaiostation » May 5th, 2019, 6:27 pm

Somebody who immigrating should open a doubles stall close to where this guy living. No trini should have to go without doubles.

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Re: Leaving Trinidad for good...

Postby zoom rader » May 5th, 2019, 6:44 pm

vaiostation wrote:Somebody who immigrating should open a doubles stall close to where this guy living. No trini should have to go without doubles.
In Cayman islands a doubles cost around $2.50US and it's not even that great. In UK I paid £2 and still was not good. Don't know about US

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Re: Leaving Trinidad for good...

Postby h1tach1 » May 5th, 2019, 8:33 pm

Experience of some of my relatives living in the abroad.

What they miss most about Trinidad, is the sense of family/community. They do not have that in the states; it is actually a very lonely life. Every year they take their only vacation time just to come home to spend time with family. When they are here however, they are very concerned about crime. The two main things stopping them from coming home are medical and crime; in that order. I agree with them on both issues. I could start a diatribe on the substandard medical services in this country (both private and public). But I digress.

If I want to be discouraged about migrating to the US, all I have to do is talk to these relatives. From the long hours of work, just to make the bills, the racism/discrimination (which seems to be on the rise), the lack of workers rights, the harsh weather, the number of people living off the system who seem to have a higher quality of life than those who actually work, etc.
But, they tolerate all of that for the safety and being able to call 911 and have help actually show up. Yes, things can go wrong medically over there but you still feel like it's taken more seriously than in Trinidad and there is accountability. One of these people actually came back to Trinidad to work in the public health sector. They could not believe the nonsense they had to deal with and the poor attitude/work ethic in the hospital. Some of the stories they told me, were quite upsetting. Finally after about two years, they went back to the states. The forex issue didn't help either.

Then, there are other relatives who had a totally different experience and would not return to Trinidad. I guess it all comes down to what you want for yourself / your family.

I am totally convinced that, for a plethora of reasons, Trinidad will not improve significantly in my lifetime. If you feel the same way and have the opportunity to migrate, go brave!

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Re: Leaving Trinidad for good...

Postby fireworks » May 5th, 2019, 10:59 pm

From own experience it was not easy when i first arrived in the US at 19 I came for holiday and liked it so much I stayed. In those days you could find work easy and you wasnt harassed by immigration so much for being undocumented. I found a job paying $300USD a week working under the table in a Manhattan post office. after 9-11 I left that job due to the anthrax scare. Found another job in JFK working for Delta and used some of the money I saved up from first job to go to school.

Its not at all easy to get going in a new country and life but once you are willing to start from the bottom, educate yourself make local friends and stay out of trouble you can succeed and enjoy a better standard of living, Now I only make $300 a day but if I feel like doing a bit of Uber that could bring another $300 extra a day. I dont live beyond my means thats another thing you got to remember its easy to get buried in credit card debt

Hmmm....there is some fella from Guyana that make $112,000 last year as a NYC garbage truck driver and his helper riding on the back of the truck. made $100,000.... helper also from Guyana. So you dont really need no big education or big job to make big money.

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Re: Leaving Trinidad for good...

Postby TheBoostLord » May 6th, 2019, 10:33 am

excellent information & experiences in here

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Re: Leaving Trinidad for good...

Postby Blaze d Chalice » May 6th, 2019, 5:26 pm

Aside from "Speaking English" and "Having famalie living" in the US/Canada/UK, what other reasons do you people (not OP specifically) have for going to mostly these 3 places?

One of the reasons I did not consider any of these places, because the majority of bottom-feeder trinis go there to run 'racket and scam' and these pests give the whole 'community' and (country) a bad name, and making it difficult for the honest ones who try to do the right things.

Why not some place like Germany for example?
Many people speak English, but job-wise and most institutions you will need to know the language, and it would also open opportunities in Austria and Switzerland.

As OP already talk about having wife and child, it might be a lil difficult to go learn a language now, but for the rest of you having something other than English and Spanish can work wonders.

Some institutions offered free German language class (Not to be confused with the refugee classes)

Some advantages:

1, you can immediately cut off all the local pests and never have to deal with them again. (I benefited from this)

2, Salaries and standard of living are higher. (I benefited from this)

3, I have seen well dressed (not too vagrant looking) type digging in the bottle bins and making at least €100/day since they pay in euros for returning bottles, if you choose that way. (This doesn't affect me/did not benefit from this)

4, Where Tertiary education (tuition) is free, it is for everyone, foreigner refugee or citizen. Some of this has changed, but only for some universities, and apparently a few more are following suit. (maybe because of an influx of UWI/Gate types)
(This also doesn't affect me/did not benefit from this)

I think most Trinis are people who don't like to get out of their 'safe zone' unless it is their last resort.
I only use German as an example because there are at least 100million speakers, but there are other options as well.

From MY personal experience, avoiding areas with trinis works out much better, and is usually safer.
The first 6 months of never seeing, hearing, talking, communicating with Trinis was such a great experience.
I realized that trinis were one of the main causes of my problems.

But Gopaul luck is not Seepaul luck.
So it might be the opposite for somebody else.

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Re: Leaving Trinidad for good...

Postby TheBoostLord » May 6th, 2019, 6:42 pm

Blaze d Chalice wrote:Aside from "Speaking English" and "Having famalie living" in the US/Canada/UK, what other reasons do you people (not OP specifically) have for going to mostly these 3 places?

One of the reasons I did not consider any of these places, because the majority of bottom-feeder trinis go there to run 'racket and scam' and these pests give the whole 'community' and (country) a bad name, and making it difficult for the honest ones who try to do the right things.

Why not some place like Germany for example?
Many people speak English, but job-wise and most institutions you will need to know the language, and it would also open opportunities in Austria and Switzerland.

As OP already talk about having wife and child, it might be a lil difficult to go learn a language now, but for the rest of you having something other than English and Spanish can work wonders.

Some institutions offered free German language class (Not to be confused with the refugee classes)

Some advantages:

1, you can immediately cut off all the local pests and never have to deal with them again. (I benefited from this)

2, Salaries and standard of living are higher. (I benefited from this)

3, I have seen well dressed (not too vagrant looking) type digging in the bottle bins and making at least €100/day since they pay in euros for returning bottles, if you choose that way. (This doesn't affect me/did not benefit from this)

4, Where Tertiary education (tuition) is free, it is for everyone, foreigner refugee or citizen. Some of this has changed, but only for some universities, and apparently a few more are following suit. (maybe because of an influx of UWI/Gate types)
(This also doesn't affect me/did not benefit from this)

I think most Trinis are people who don't like to get out of their 'safe zone' unless it is their last resort.
I only use German as an example because there are at least 100million speakers, but there are other options as well.

From MY personal experience, avoiding areas with trinis works out much better, and is usually safer.
The first 6 months of never seeing, hearing, talking, communicating with Trinis was such a great experience.
I realized that trinis were one of the main causes of my problems.

But Gopaul luck is not Seepaul luck.
So it might be the opposite for somebody else.


The language barrier and immigration polices are basically why. Its not easy to learn a language as an adult. Germany is not easy to immigrate to either. Its not attractive to the regular caribbean person unless they have lots of free time and not much responsibilities (i.e. young) and posses the desire for succeeding in such an environment.

Funny you mentioned Germany tho, about 7 years ago in North Carolina i met a German girl, 30, who came to usa to do her masters cus she said she saw all those teen college movies about the usa and campus life and she wanted to experience it so bad that despite having just ok english she made the jump. She said her family told her she was crazy. Her english was more than adequate when i spoke to her at the end of the one year there. She came from a small town of maybe 800 people she told me.

Also my wife's aunt was married and lived in Norway for a very long time until her husband died and the guys family didnt really like her so she came back Trini.

One of my friends met a Swedish guy on tinder, in trinidad a few years ago and she went over got married, and learnt a lot of the language and even setup her own yoga studio, but immigration is hell and shes here right now still battling it. Having been to Sweden I can understand why she would put up and fight so much for it. Lovely country.

My sister even lived in Denmark, Belgium and few other places, she learnt a good deal of Dutch + Norwegian but the only real way for permanent residence was to get married and she wasnt about that life. Shes back here.

3 Years ago in Barbados I met a Trini who has not been to Trinidad in over 20 years. He was in barbados on a training course. He originally migrated to Canada, met a European woman, got married and is living in Switzerland with his 2 kids. He wants no part of Trinidad again. Was sad to hear but i understood.

Basically there are persons that would love to go off the beaten path but its not that easily accessible. The safe zones make leaving here a much more practical step since you have island/family help and immigration is more accommodating and for a lot of them they still gain a better quality of life, all things considered.

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Re: Leaving Trinidad for good...

Postby xtech » May 6th, 2019, 7:06 pm

TheBoostLord wrote:
Blaze d Chalice wrote:Aside from "Speaking English" and "Having famalie living" in the US/Canada/UK, what other reasons do you people (not OP specifically) have for going to mostly these 3 places?

One of the reasons I did not consider any of these places, because the majority of bottom-feeder trinis go there to run 'racket and scam' and these pests give the whole 'community' and (country) a bad name, and making it difficult for the honest ones who try to do the right things.

Why not some place like Germany for example?
Many people speak English, but job-wise and most institutions you will need to know the language, and it would also open opportunities in Austria and Switzerland.

As OP already talk about having wife and child, it might be a lil difficult to go learn a language now, but for the rest of you having something other than English and Spanish can work wonders.

Some institutions offered free German language class (Not to be confused with the refugee classes)

Some advantages:

1, you can immediately cut off all the local pests and never have to deal with them again. (I benefited from this)

2, Salaries and standard of living are higher. (I benefited from this)

3, I have seen well dressed (not too vagrant looking) type digging in the bottle bins and making at least €100/day since they pay in euros for returning bottles, if you choose that way. (This doesn't affect me/did not benefit from this)

4, Where Tertiary education (tuition) is free, it is for everyone, foreigner refugee or citizen. Some of this has changed, but only for some universities, and apparently a few more are following suit. (maybe because of an influx of UWI/Gate types)
(This also doesn't affect me/did not benefit from this)

I think most Trinis are people who don't like to get out of their 'safe zone' unless it is their last resort.
I only use German as an example because there are at least 100million speakers, but there are other options as well.

From MY personal experience, avoiding areas with trinis works out much better, and is usually safer.
The first 6 months of never seeing, hearing, talking, communicating with Trinis was such a great experience.
I realized that trinis were one of the main causes of my problems.

But Gopaul luck is not Seepaul luck.
So it might be the opposite for somebody else.


The language barrier and immigration polices are basically why. Its not easy to learn a language as an adult. Germany is not easy to immigrate to either. Its not attractive to the regular caribbean person unless they have lots of free time and not much responsibilities (i.e. young) and posses the desire for succeeding in such an environment.

Funny you mentioned Germany tho, about 7 years ago in North Carolina i met a German girl, 30, who came to usa to do her masters cus she said she saw all those teen college movies about the usa and campus life and she wanted to experience it so bad that despite having just ok english she made the jump. She said her family told her she was crazy. Her english was more than adequate when i spoke to her at the end of the one year there. She came from a small town of maybe 800 people she told me.

Also my wife's aunt was married and lived in Norway for a very long time until her husband died and the guys family didnt really like her so she came back Trini.

One of my friends met a Swedish guy on tinder, in trinidad a few years ago and she went over got married, and learnt a lot of the language and even setup her own yoga studio, but immigration is hell and shes here right now still battling it. Having been to Sweden I can understand why she would put up and fight so much for it. Lovely country.

My sister even lived in Denmark, Belgium and few other places, she learnt a good deal of Dutch + Norwegian but the only real way for permanent residence was to get married and she wasnt about that life. Shes back here.

3 Years ago in Barbados I met a Trini who has not been to Trinidad in over 20 years. He was in barbados on a training course. He originally migrated to Canada, met a European woman, got married and is living in Switzerland with his 2 kids. He wants no part of Trinidad again. Was sad to hear but i understood.

Basically there are persons that would love to go off the beaten path but its not that easily accessible. The safe zones make leaving here a much more practical step since you have island/family help and immigration is more accommodating and for a lot of them they still gain a better quality of life, all things considered.




yup... i lived Upstate NY in a small town in the Adirondacks....the North country as they like to call it where there is no Trini for 100 miles...... lol might have one or 2 but they haven't been here for most of their lives. As much as I hate to admit it, It is refreshing to get away from my own people. Its so much less stressful dealing with Trini show off and aggressive mentality. Plus it feels good to have white folks work hard to serve you. When ever I drive back to New Jersey, Brooklyn and Queens even in Albany you know exactly where Caribbean people abode. It nasty and people :agrue: Thank god I pushed my way out of that nasty over crowded inner-city living.

Anyone thinking of going overseas to start over and wants to succeed needs to know that while it seems like crazy advice you have to make friends who are not from back home (Think crabs in a box). The locals go out of their way to help you if you show them you are willing to learn

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Re: Leaving Trinidad for good...

Postby agent007 » May 13th, 2019, 12:23 am

What country do you all prefer guys? Australia or Canada? They both accept the IELTS english assessment exam which is being booked by dozens of candidates as we speak until July 2019. I found this out a few seconds ago.

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Re: Leaving Trinidad for good...

Postby TheBoostLord » May 13th, 2019, 9:13 am

agent007 wrote:What country do you all prefer guys? Australia or Canada? They both accept the IELTS english assessment exam which is being booked by dozens of candidates as we speak until July 2019. I found this out a few seconds ago.


Whichever you get accepted to. IELTS isnt a huge deal. they have a lot of candidates because its an international organization that you have to go through, and only 1 place does it in the region. (had ppl from guyana and other carribean islands in my group) So if you have to go study in canada you need ielts certification, work permit in another country, ielts. etc so its not all migration.

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Re: Leaving Trinidad for good...

Postby ek4ever » May 19th, 2019, 1:28 pm

widdyphuck wrote:Every sector or Industry is maxed out in Trinidad. No Vacancies in teaching, Medical Field, Engineering, Project Management etc..
Is leaving Trinidad the best option?
For persons that migrated, or lived a portion of their lives abroad, what are the issues with surviving elsewhere as a Trini?
Yes, leaving is the only option. Sit from afar and watch this sh!thole WOFT country go to hell. Have plenty and ready

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Re: Leaving Trinidad for good...

Postby ek4ever » May 19th, 2019, 1:40 pm

shake d livin wake d dead wrote:
agent007 wrote:I heard to go Canada you have to be young, educated and you must pass some UWI English exam to be invited into their country. I also heard that hundreds of people sit the exam each month, the majority of which are doing so to enter Canada (and it not cheap, think it’s like $2k per exam). Lastly, I was told the main thing is French. Once you could speak French you GT. But winter time up there different, it can get so cold, it’s like getting stabbed repeatedly with knives.


The english exam is known as IELTS...offered at CLL and is hard AF...Im in the process of doing it cuz Canada is on my list...but im finishing meh spanish first....if a person did english for academic purposes @ uwi, it's a good start for IELTS...

questions I got when starting the canada process were:

Highest form of education
The instiution
Married
Average salary per mth
Average savings figure
Why canada
English test easy as fcuk..... averaged a 9/10 in each section. Not surprised Trinis find this challenging as most have rudimentary reading and writing skills and speak like they from the ghetto. Canada right to have this mandatory for applicants from Trinidad

rspann
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Re: Leaving Trinidad for good...

Postby rspann » May 19th, 2019, 1:51 pm

What experiences have you had that cause you to be so sick of Trinidad? Please share .
I know there are challenges and anywhere you go will have some, but I think it's about being able to adapt.

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Re: Leaving Trinidad for good...

Postby Redress10 » May 19th, 2019, 2:11 pm

rspann wrote:What experiences have you had that cause you to be so sick of Trinidad? Please share .
I know there are challenges and anywhere you go will have some, but I think it's about being able to adapt.


Not about experiences bro. Quality of life in Trinidad is very low. Even paid services such as healthcare etc are not world class and are more exploitative than excellent. Once you experience a high quality of life overseas, education etc then living in the developing world will never be appealing.

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Re: Leaving Trinidad for good...

Postby rspann » May 19th, 2019, 2:34 pm

I won't deny that, but is everyone in Trinidad fed up to the extent that they want to migrate permanently? Redress, do you live in Trinidad? Are you making it here satisfactorily? Would you leave ( if you live here) at the slightest opportunity?

I travel to the US nearly every month for business and I've never had the urge to leave here and settle over there, while one of my close friends left everything here and settled there to make a better opportunity for two of his children( education for one ,and health care etc) . He works in a Home depot and his wife in Target , but when he was here he had his own business . Now he works late nights and weekends too, depends on the shift.

I agree with Redman, it's all about your priorities, and how much you put into it,

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Re: Leaving Trinidad for good...

Postby ek4ever » May 19th, 2019, 2:38 pm

rspann wrote:What experiences have you had that cause you to be so sick of Trinidad? Please share .
I know there are challenges and anywhere you go will have some, but I think it's about being able to adapt.
I personally want to live in a country that does not have a one horse economy, offers activities to do year round and have services that actually work. My son will also benefit from Canadian education and opportunities.

Trinidad is an undisciplined country where you have to fight up to get anything done. Can't wait to get my Canadian citizenship... will have a party to bun my Trini passport. Then I won't have to come back to this country ever again.

Only thing I usually miss when I'm out of Trinidad is the food and I can cook everything I want. Other than that Trinidad offers nothing else.

The only thing Trinidad can offer as a Caribbean country are the beaches which in most cases are deplorable, nasty and usually have muffler bearings blaring music and disturbing everyone with their dotish behavior. Shopping and entertainment is 3rd world crap.

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Re: Leaving Trinidad for good...

Postby rspann » May 19th, 2019, 2:49 pm

I understand your points ,and only you could make the correct decision for yourself and your family. it's just that I've seen so many people migrate and retun here because it didn't work for them ,and yet it did for others. So I guess it's what you make of it. My sister in law was born in Canada when my in- laws went there when the whole of Penal rushed there years ago, and they came back not too long after. She grew up here but went there to live when she got married. Her two children were also born there and they enjoy the benefits you speak about.

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Re: Leaving Trinidad for good...

Postby vaiostation » May 19th, 2019, 4:25 pm

^^^Trinidad now, and Trinidad in the near future isn't a place where people want to return to. In the past we didn't have all this crime, the cost of living wasn't so high, you could have easily find jobs, healthcare was decent, education was good, you could walk the road or go to the beach without feeling like you gonna get robbed or raped, and also we weren't being invaded by the Spanish and Chinese mafia. But that is Trinidad of the past. Them days gone now. I believe giving the current state of the island, that if people were given the chance to migrate, they would. I don't mind paying higher taxes for good healthcare, education and policing, as well as giving my children a fair chance at life.

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Re: Leaving Trinidad for good...

Postby xtech » May 19th, 2019, 4:53 pm

Things not that bad yet. In 2018 over 180,000 trinidadians visited USA on visitor visas. Only 1,100 overstayed, 3000 got green cards

300,000 Jamaicans went. 10,000 never returned, 31,000 got greencards

When figures for Trinidad start looking like that you know things getting bad
Last edited by xtech on May 19th, 2019, 6:34 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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maj. tom
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Re: Leaving Trinidad for good...

Postby maj. tom » May 19th, 2019, 4:54 pm

^ better to pay the tax in Canada and get returns in everything from safety to paved roads to healthcare, than pay it here and get nothing but stink corruption and fear and death.

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Re: Leaving Trinidad for good...

Postby zoom rader » May 19th, 2019, 6:24 pm

rspann wrote:I understand your points ,and only you could make the correct decision for yourself and your family. it's just that I've seen so many people migrate and retun here because it didn't work for them ,and yet it did for others. So I guess it's what you make of it. My sister in law was born in Canada when my in- laws went there when the whole of Penal rushed there years ago, and they came back not too long after. She grew up here but went there to live when she got married. Her two children were also born there and they enjoy the benefits you speak about.
Rspann, it is better that ppl try to do something than sit and fail. If they go abroad and failed then they tried and saw what was life about and how another country operates.

Those that I knew that left, left with nothing and are living a comfortable life. They don't make a whole lot but they are better off than dealing with living here. Then there are highly educated ones that I know, they made it big and have never looked back comming here.

There are two that I know of that left and came back and they said it was not for them. They were engineers so it was easy for them to get jobs back in Trini.

I have never tried to leave. I have worked abroad in a few countries and thought about leaving but it was not for me. I came very close to living in the Cayman islands but their immigration policy is very strict and a long wait to get citizenship which is 15 years. If I was younger then I would have taken up that opportunity.

For all those young folk if you desire a change then go for it if you know your furture here looks grim.

I can probably foresee a brain drain comming up with the current Trini behaviour as we did in the past.

Take your chances while you can

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Re: Leaving Trinidad for good...

Postby rspann » May 19th, 2019, 6:32 pm

I guess if you have nothing and nothing is on the horizon, then it might be a good thing for a young person.


Zoom, look on the bright side. UNC not winning anytime soon , so Rowley, Imbert, Stuart and Faris here for at least the next 11 years, so Trinidad should get back good given some time.

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