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Everything you need to know about: Lifting your truck

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lighthammer
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Everything you need to know about: Lifting your truck

Postby lighthammer » June 4th, 2011, 4:54 pm

So, you want to lift your truck? Make it stand out over the hundreds of chromed-out, riced-down vigo's, navara's and triton's out there on our roads?

Lifting a truck is a much more complicated venture than buying 22-inch rims and slapping them on, this actually requires a bit more knowhow and technical investment; hence you should take the time to read more about lifting your truck before doing so.

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Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Billy_Han

A Beginner's Guide to 4x4 Suspension Lift Kits
By Billy Han



You see them all the time: Light trucks, Sport Utility Vehicles, Jeeps, and more, coasting down the highway, sitting atop towering truck suspension lift kits and sporting a set of tires so big that a person could live in them. If you're the curious type looking to lift up your own rig, a more important question than "How do I get my ride to do that" is "Why should my ride do that?"

There are several reasons why people might customize their vehicles with suspension lift kits, as well as quite a bit to know before you get started. If you're a seasoned veteran who has conquered the most vicious terrains and knows your vehicle better than your own mother, there probably isn't much for you to learn here. On the other hand, if you're just getting started and want to familiarize yourself with the basics, read on.

Why should I lift my ride?


Glad you asked. Equipping vehicles with a suspension lift kits involves much more than buying the sexiest looking truck lift kit and then dropping your ride off at the local mechanic. Actually, chances are good that if that's all you plan to do, lifting your ride might not be right for you in the first place. Installing truck suspension lift kits requires some hard work, a bit of technical savvy and consistent upkeep and attention to your vehicle's components.

The first determination you need to make when considering suspension lift kits is what you want to do with it. There are essentially two main purposes for installing truck lift kits: style or function. Although the two are somewhat interrelated, it's still important to consider which purpose you most wish to pursue, as it will assist you in making the correct modifications to your vehicle.



Style:

Let's face it: Transforming a vehicle into a style statement has been a popular hobby ever since the advent of tailfins and flame decals. As much as we all might chuckle at a hybrid hatchback sitting on 18" wheels, or the family sedan with a wing that resembles the Seattle Space Needle more than a spoiler, we also find our own vehicles having fuzzy dice hanging from the mirror, or a bobbling hula dancer statuette on the dash. As far as style is concerned, adding truck lift kits makes more of an impression than anything else you can do to your ride. Heads turn instantly at the sight of a lifted rig with massive tires that appear to be sprouting fangs and an exhaust system that scares stray puppies into hiding.

When it comes to adding suspension lift kits to make a style statement, looking good is the easy part. Sometimes it's easy to overlook general, everyday performance in the midst of decking out a ride. For this reason, choosing the right suspension lift kit with attention to comfort, reliability, durability, safety, and not to mention price, should be given just as much consideration as those precious inches you want to add.



Performance:

So you've made the jump into tuning your rig for the off-road world, and you're ready to take the plunge to invest in one of many truck lift kits. But before diving headfirst into a custom truck lift kit and gigantic tires, there are a number of issues to address to ensure a correct setup. The first step is to ask yourself what you will be doing the most, whether it's slow-speed rock crawling, high-speed desert racing, general purpose 4 wheeling, mud racing, or long distance open country treks. From there, you can narrow down what you need to do in order to customize your vehicle to suit your needs.

Whether you're just starting out, or you're the experienced professional, tuning your rig for optimum off-road performance is an expansive hobby with numerous factors to be wary of. The possibilities are limitless, which can sometimes make it hard to determine exactly which suspension lift kits are ideal for what you want.



Where do I begin?

As if determining which suspension lift kits to purchase weren't complicated enough, installing truck lift kits can alter other components in your vehicle, sometimes causing unforeseen issues that could affect performance or be potentially detrimental to the vehicle itself. For example, drive shaft length, steering geometry, brake lines, highway performance and handling, gear ratios, and overall weight are just a few of the factors that could potentially be impacted by adding truck suspension lift kits.

Finding ample resources to determine what products you need can be difficult. Speaking with a mechanic can provide some insight. Reading factory service manuals, off-road magazines, internet message boards, manufacturer's guides, and a number of other resources can help as well. But by far the most useful way to determine what truck lift kits are right for you and your vehicle is to consult an experienced and knowledgeable person who has a vehicle similar to yours and uses it in the manner similar to what you want to do. Not only can such a person suggest the correct products, but also likely has experience with installation tips and general drivability.

In the meantime, here are some of the basic elements of suspension lift kits for you to keep in mind as you plan your modifications.



What does a Suspension Lift Kit do?


1. Clearance

For starters, one of the foremost reasons for installing truck suspension lift kits is to raise the height of your ride off the ground to enable steeper ascent or descent off-road, and higher ground clearance. In general, it makes sense that when driving over boulders, slogging through mud, coasting across the desert, or even just making your way through the occasional forest trail, higher clearance facilitates negotiating certain obstacles. This can often be a tricky bit of artistry to manage, as higher clearance also raises your vehicle's center of gravity, which can reduce handling.


2. Larger Tire Fitment

The general consensus suggests that larger tires equate to more traction, right? Well, not entirely. While larger tires may provide some improvement to traction in off-road conditions, there are other ways to improve a vehicle's traction that are far more efficient than simply bulking up the rubber. Aside from the obvious stylistic discretion, the main reasons for adding larger tires are for higher vehicle clearance for improved performance in mud, deep snow, rocks, and deeply rutted trails. Certain tires designed specifically for off-road conditions can improve traction depending on the circumstances, but the added clearance is the most immediate and direct benefit of larger tires.



Factors to Consider with Truck Suspension Lift Kits:

* Installation: Many manufacturers offer manuals for installing truck lift kits onto certain vehicles; however, some installations are quite intricate, requiring some welding or cutting in order to add some necessary components. In this case, having a trusted mechanic or a few knowledgeable friends is the best resolution.
* Additional Modifications: Upgrading to truck lift kits with taller tires also means that a number of components may require part upgrades or some tuning to compensate. For instance, a truck's engine is tuned at specific gear ratios to propel the vehicle. When adding taller tires, the gear ratios must be tweaked accordingly, since the engine has to spin much larger, heavier tires. Again, consult with more experienced individuals for further insight.
* Highway Performance: Larger, wider tires can sometimes result in instability on roads or a noisy, uncomfortable ride, particularly at high speeds. Also, more aggressive off-road tires tend to wear faster on the highway, and traction might not be as great as you would expect on wet roads. In this sense, larger tires can sometimes be a gamble without any direction from an experienced off-road veteran.
* Weight: larger tires are heavier, which can put a lot of strain on your suspension, particularly if it's a stock suspension. Trusted, durable suspension components and lighter aluminum wheels can sometimes help to reduce the strain.
* Handling: Adding truck suspension lift kits will undoubtedly raise the vehicle's center of gravity, resulting in less stable turns. This is a common issue when installing truck lift kits, but is mostly just a matter of becoming accustomed to a vehicle's change in performance.
* Legality: Some suspension lift kits are such a serious change in your suspension system that it may not be legal. Check the suspension regulations within your country, state, or province to be sure.
* A Few Useful Accessories: Before installing a lift kit, it's a good idea to first examine if any components will be affected by your vehicle's new height. Here are a few useful accessories that may need to be upgraded:

- Brake Upgrades: Stock brakes can't always accommodate larger tires, or will wear easily due to the added strain.
- Drivetrain and Differential: Axles, gears, differential covers, lockers and more ensure that your drivetrain is up to par with your suspension.
- Replacement Parts: Longer Control Arms and Track Bars to compensate for the additional height of your rig.
- Shocks: For those taller lifts, longer shocks will ensure the smoothest performance both on and off road.
- Other Parts: Steering linkage, slip yoke, drive shaft length, u-joint angle, and brake lines are all worthy of consideration before installing suspension lift kits.




Installing Suspension Lift Kits:

When it comes time to install a lift kit, there are two ways possible ways to go about it: install it yourself, or have a professional do the job. Naturally, each has its advantages and disadvantages, and when it comes to your rig, attention to detail is crucial. A general rule to follow is that even if you know you want a large lift, it's best to start with a small lift and work your way up. This allows you to work out any kinks and hindrances along the way to make sure your kit works right.


1. Do-It-Yourself

Even if you're not technically inclined, taking the time to learn the inner mechanics of your vehicle is a valuable experience that can save you time and money. An intimate knowledge of your rig can also allow you to make your own modifications to your vehicle if the need arises. There are numerous resources available that can usually guide you through the majority of the process; however, one must keep in mind that it's a lot to take in, and tweaking the intricate components of your vehicle is no small matter. It's always a good idea to have a second set of hands or an experienced individual assisting you.

On the downside, even with the increasing availability of bolt-on kits, installing suspension lift kits is no easy task, particularly if you're a beginner. Additionally, certain instructions or resources can sometimes be misleading or based upon the personal preferences of individual gearheads. Often times, after installing a lift kit you'll find yourself spending hours tweaking the other components of your vehicle to get them back to spec. That's a whole lot to take on, particularly if you're inexperienced.


2. Mechanic

A licensed professional installing your lift kit is typically the best way to ensure that suspension lift kits are installed correctly, so long as you're willing to pay the labor charges. A professional can perfectly tune your vehicle to your liking and see to it that all components are working as they should, all within a fraction of the time it would take even the most experienced gearheads to install it themselves.

On the other hand, as is the case with regard to any mechanic, it might be difficult to find one you can trust to install the kit properly while not overcharging you for any unnecessary parts. Also, if you're not a gearhead, anytime there's a functional deficiency or your vehicle needs minor tweaking, you have no choice but to return to the mechanic for service.


Suspension Lift Sizes:

Small: A small lift consists of 1.5 or fewer inches, and will grant you a little more clearance and room to run slightly larger tires. The most common way to gain a small lift is by using coil spacers in front and long shackles in the rear.


* Advantages/Disadvantages: Small lifts are inexpensive and easy to install with very few complications.


Medium: A medium lift is roughly 2" of lift, and is a good choice for those looking for the best tire clearance, but aren't planning on doing any off-roading. Common medium-sized lifts use spacer and add-a-leaf lifts, and sometimes come with new shocks.


* Advantages/Disadvantages: You'll notice changes in handling and performance: some good, some bad. You'll also need strong rear springs, and if you plan to use an add-a-leaf kit, later modification for more lift may be difficult, since add-a-leafs are designed to lift stock springs.


Large: The largest lifts consist of 3 to 4" or more for an aggressive look and the best off-road performance. A common large lift setup consists of new front coils and add-a-leafs in the rear, plus some combination of new front coils and new rear springs. These kits often include a matching set of shocks.


* Advantages/Disadvantages: Large lifts are obviously the most expensive, and more complications are expected than with smaller lifts. On-road performance will also be affected, sometimes dramatically. But a large lift will transform your rig into an intimidating off-road machine that will stand out among a crowd.


Types of Suspension Lift Kits:

Spring Over Axle (SPOA):

SPOA suspension lift kits are most popular among serious rock crawlers looking for the utmost articulation (up and down wheel travel). These truck lift kits keep the tires on the ground for maximum traction, while correctly lifted springs lifts everything out of harm's way, including the springs.

Shackle Reverse (S/R) Suspension Lift Kits:

S/R truck lift kits are designed to provide a smooth ride upon mild terrain such as forest roads, desert driving, and scenic trails; however, high-speed driving on highways is not recommended.

Coil Suspension Lift Kits:

The choice of many of the world's best-riding 4 wheel drive vehicles, Coil Suspension Lift Kits offer unrivaled ride quality and cheaper springs, but installation sometimes requires some welding. The end result, however, is a suspension lift kit that provides excellent articulation on the trail, and a comfortable ride you have to feel to believe.

Lifted Spring Suspension Lift Kits:

The most commonly used type of truck lift kits in the world, Lifted Spring systems are easier to install, and an excellent choice for first-time lifters in the off-road world. These truck lift kits allow you to run larger tires for additional clearance, while producing control on the highway.

Shackle Suspension Lift Kits:


As probably the most affordable way to add inches to your rig, Shackle Suspension Lift Kits are primarily for the truck enthusiast looking to add larger tires, yet are not intending to do much hardcore off-roading. Moderation is recommended with these truck lift kits, as Shackle systems are known to affect steering and sway control.


Last edited by lighthammer on June 4th, 2011, 5:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Everything you need to know about: Lifting your truck

Postby lighthammer » June 4th, 2011, 4:56 pm

Another article on different options for lifting your truck.

Source: Club Frontier



This is the updated and expanded lift sticky for 2005+ Frontiers. If you have a question about lifting your truck, please read this section before posting your question. There is a good chance that it will be answered here.

If you notice any errors, please PM me or any of the moderators.

Thank you to all the members who contributed to this thread with your suggestions, information, and pictures of your trucks (including HarshReality001, who wrote the original lift sticky and gave me his blessing in updating it).

BIG THANKS to domoMKIV, who made this project much easier by compiling all of the photographs, proofreading multiple drafts, offering ideas, and allowing me to bounce ideas off of him.

The second post in this thread includes examples of what our trucks look like when they are lifted.

BODY LIFTS
Lift amount: 2" to 3" in kit form from AC. If you go the DIY route you can do a different height. (1" Body Lift...Done!)
Pros: Increased body clearance and fenderwell clearance for larger tires.
Cons: Does nothing for suspension flex. Bumper relocation brackets have to be fabbed if you do not buy a kit (most kits only come with front brackets).
Cost: $75-$350
Brands: Performance Accessories lift --> which can be acquired through PRG Products, Automotive Customizers or do-it-yourself.
Courtesy: domoMKIV

SUSPENSION LIFTS
FRONT
Spacers
Lift amount: 1.5” to 3”
Pros: Inexpensive. Fairly easy to install. Factory ride maintained.
Cons: Wheel travel is limited. High chance of coil bucket contact with spacers over 2”.
Notes: Noise from coil bucket contact can be eliminated with bump stops (cheap) or aftermarket upper control arms (better method but more expensive). Aftermarket UCAs highly recommended for 3" spacers. Some kits come with bump stops.
Cost: $60-$200 (more for kits)
Brands: ADF, Calmini, Daystar, PRG, ReadyLift (kit with bump stops, camber bolts, shackles for rear), Revtek (kit with blocks for rear), Rough Country, Truxxx (kit with bump stops and blocks for rear).

Height Adjustable Shocks
Lift amount: 0.5” to 2”
Pros: Better up-travel than with a spacer lift.
Cons: Rancho QuickLift shocks may leak over time.
Notes: Some report that the Bilsteins are very stiff when adjusted at maximum height, but most feel the ride quality is improved at a more modest setting. QuickLift shocks are softer, and the stiffness is adjustable.
Cost: $180-$300
Brands: Bilstein, Rancho.

Lift Coils
Lift amount: 1.5” to 2.5”
Pros: Better articulation than with spacer lift. Low chance of coil bucket contact.
Cons: Difficult to compress for initial installation. Can be stiff.
Notes: There are light duty coils for trucks with stock bumpers, and heavy duty coils for trucks with aftermarket bumpers and winches. Heavy duty coils will feel stiff on a vehicle with a stock bumper, but may add a small amount of additional lift. A combination that is becoming popular is 1.5” OME coils with Bilstein adjustable shocks (with HD OME coils and the Bilsteins set at 0.5”, this combination supposedly gives you around 3” of lift). HD coils with adjustable Bils are not recommended with a stock bumper, as your ride quality may suffer off-road.
Cost: About $150
Brands: Automotive Customizers, Old Man Emu.

Coilovers
Lift amount: Up to 2.5” for 4WD and up to 3.5” for 2WD (with stock UCAs); up to 3” for 4WD and up to 4” for 2WD (with aftermarket UCAs).
Pros: Wheel travel increased by approximately 2” (3” with aftermarket UCAs).
Cons: Expensive. Require periodic servicing.
Notes: Can use LD or HD springs depending on your needs.
Cost: $700-$1,500. Aftermarket UCAs will add an additional $500-$700.
Brands: Icon, King, Radflo, Sway-A-Way (coilovers). Automotive Customizers, Calmini, CST, PRG, Total Chaos (UCAs).

Spindles
Lift amount: 4”
Pros: Excellent ride quality.
Cons: Expensive. Relatively difficult to install.
Notes: 2WD ONLY! Cannot be used on 4WD trucks!
Cost: About $800
Brands: CST.

Titan Swap
Lift amount: Up to 4” (additional lift can be achieved with spindles)
Pros: This is considered a “mid travel” set-up; wheel travel is increased by 3-6” (depending on coilovers, UCAs, etc). Front end will be beefier (many Titan components are stronger than comparable Frontier parts).
Cons: Expensive. Time-consuming to install (and to acquire parts). Vehicle will have more difficulty navigating narrow trails.
Notes: Vehicle will have a wider stance in the front. For more information on installing a Titan swap, refer to this sticky: Titan Swap: Front end Suspension - Install with pics
Cost: Varies from several hundred to several thousand depending on how many junkyard parts vs. new parts are used, and the number of aftermarket performance upgrades included.
Brands: PRG or do-it-yourself.

Drop Bracket Kit
Lift amount: 5” to 6”
Pros: Lots of lift. Ability to run larger tires with minor trimming.
Cons: Expensive. Limits ground clearance. Drive shaft vibrations may occur. Installation requires cutting into the frame. As is, these kits are primarily for looks (although they perform well off-road with the appropriate upgrades).
Notes: Short of using a body lift with your suspension lift, this is the only way you can lift a 4WD over 3”! These lifts are offered as an entire kit including drop bracket, spacers, rear lift components, etc. They can be upgraded with aftermarket coilovers and other performance parts.
Cost: $1,400-$2,000 with spacers ($2,000-$3,000 with coilovers)
Brands: Calmini, Fabtech.

REAR
Blocks
Lift amount: 1” to 2”
Pros: Inexpensive.
Cons: Axle wrap with the larger blocks. Can weaken the leaf springs over time. No added flex.
Cost: $65-$90
Brands: Calmini, PRG; also included in some spacer kits.

Shackles
Lift amount: 1/2” to 2”
Pros: Inexpensive. Easy to install. Factory ride maintained. Add a small amount of flex.
Cons: Leaf springs may flatten over time.
Notes: Some companies make adjustable-height shackles. Automotive Customizers also offers revolver shackles which offer a significant amount of flex when used with AALs.
Cost: $70-$120 ($310 for revolver shackles)
Brands: Automotive Customizers, Calmini, PRG; also included in some spacer kits.

Add-A-Leafs
Lift amount: 2” to 3”
Pros: Increased load carrying capacity. Multi-leaf AALs will add a fair amount of flex.
Cons: More difficult to install than blocks or shackles. There have been some complaints of the leaf springs flattening over a long period of time, but this is typically less of an issue than with shackles.
Cost: $65-$165
Brands: Automotive Customizers, Prerunnerparts, PRG (Deavers).

New Leaf Pack
Lift amount: 2” to 3”
Pros: Significantly improved ride quality. More stout than the stock leaf pack. Some brands increase load carrying capacity.
Cons: Expensive.
Notes: Instead of a new Frontier leaf pack, an Xterra leaf pack can be used to gain about 4 inches of lift for a fraction of the cost. (DIY - Rebuilt Leaf Springs.)
Cost: $350-$650
Brands: Automotive Customizers, PRG.



OTHER THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW
Shocks
Front: Front shocks generally do not require replacement. With lift coils, it is recommended that stock shocks be replaced with heavy duty front shocks.
Rear: Longer rear shocks are not required for lifts up to 2”, but they are recommended. Shocks should be replaced with longer rear shocks for any lift over 2”.
Brake Lines/ABS Lines
Front: Brake lines may need to be replaced with longer lines when the front is lifted over 3”. Brake and ABS lines may need to be unclipped with smaller lifts.
Rear: Brake lines may need to be replaced with longer lines when the rear is lifted over 5”. Brake and ABS lines may need to be unclipped with smaller lifts.
Alignment
An alignment is required anytime the suspension is altered. Frontiers built after mid-2005 may require aftermarket adjustable camber bolts in order to align properly, particularly if they are lifted over 2 inches. (Early 2005 Frontiers came with adjustable camber bolts.)
Tires
For most lifts, the maximum tire size you can fit without rubbing and without trimming is 265/75/16 (equivalent of a 32 inch tire). Many people fit 285/75/16 (about 33 inch) tires with minor melting or trimming in the front (including removal of the front mud flaps). 35 inch tires will fit on a drop bracket kit with a moderate amount of trimming, but it is not recommended to run 35 inch tires on anything except a “street vehicle” without re-gearing and other modifications.

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Re: Everything you need to know about: Lifting your truck

Postby civic minded » June 4th, 2011, 5:32 pm

i feel more enlightened - thanks dude!

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Re: Everything you need to know about: Lifting your truck

Postby lighthammer » June 4th, 2011, 5:43 pm

does this article... lift your spirts?


:mrgreen:

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Re: Everything you need to know about: Lifting your truck

Postby civic minded » June 4th, 2011, 5:59 pm

yes it takes it to new heights!

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Re: Everything you need to know about: Lifting your truck

Postby lighthammer » June 4th, 2011, 6:15 pm

try not to get on a high-horse though...

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Re: Everything you need to know about: Lifting your truck

Postby civic minded » June 4th, 2011, 6:31 pm

i will try not to get caught UP in it.

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Re: Everything you need to know about: Lifting your truck

Postby lighthammer » June 4th, 2011, 7:37 pm

but you just seem above it all....

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Re: Everything you need to know about: Lifting your truck

Postby civic minded » June 4th, 2011, 7:58 pm

nah just like to see things in a new High

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Re: Everything you need to know about: Lifting your truck

Postby speedaholic » June 5th, 2011, 1:06 am

very nice article Leo... gud job as ussual..

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Re: Everything you need to know about: Lifting your truck

Postby sliderz1 » June 5th, 2011, 10:35 am

i am intrigued ......... :popcorn:

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Re: Everything you need to know about: Lifting your truck

Postby MrCuddles » June 6th, 2011, 10:20 pm

if it wasnt for speedy no tellin hw long dey wood hv been goin at it....lol

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Re: Everything you need to know about: Lifting your truck

Postby droppa » June 7th, 2011, 8:18 am

nice find boi leo.....

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Re: Everything you need to know about: Lifting your truck

Postby speedaholic » June 7th, 2011, 11:19 am

how you mean boicuddlesboi?

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Re: Everything you need to know about: Lifting your truck

Postby lighthammer » June 7th, 2011, 11:20 am

had to look "high" and low for this info.... lol.

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Re: Everything you need to know about: Lifting your truck

Postby droppa » June 7th, 2011, 12:23 pm

so is big UP yuh wanted!!

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Re: Everything you need to know about: Lifting your truck

Postby droppa » June 7th, 2011, 12:43 pm

Surf with 4"lift....

Image

Image
10" Suspension.
3" Body Lift.
Mickey Thompson Baja Claw 46x19.5/15 Tyres.
14x15 Steel Rims.
Full Safety Devices Roll Bar.
Fully worked Rover V8 - 200+BHP with gas conversion kit.
Rallye seats & Harnesses.
Diff lock & Front Mount Winch.

Image

Image

Image
4' Suspension Lift
3' Body Lift
35' Tyres

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

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Re: Everything you need to know about: Lifting your truck

Postby sliderz1 » June 17th, 2011, 11:19 pm

note that the Navaras and Titans have similiar front suspensions.........


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Re: Everything you need to know about: Lifting your truck

Postby sliderz1 » June 17th, 2011, 11:21 pm

and


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Re: Everything you need to know about: Lifting your truck

Postby *Phoenix* » June 17th, 2011, 11:49 pm

Are there any options for local lift kits for a 2003 Hilux?
PM me info if yall cant post...

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Re: Everything you need to know about: Lifting your truck

Postby lighthammer » June 18th, 2011, 6:08 am

Phoenix, you can ask a machinist to make some lifting blocks for you.
We were scoping out a lifted mazda bt50 with a body-lift, he had some teflon spacers made - looked to a 50mm/ 3-inch lift he had. All you need to do is go under the truck, look at the blocks on which the body is mounted to the chassis and make measurements, and get the machinist to cut them out for you.

You'll also need to make spacers for the suspension as well, to get the shocks back to the same height as before so you don't lose articulation.


Have a look and see!

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Re: Everything you need to know about: Lifting your truck

Postby sliderz1 » June 22nd, 2011, 9:41 pm


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Re: Everything you need to know about: Lifting your truck

Postby jpec » June 29th, 2011, 5:46 pm

idk if half of yall know this but putting coil spacers on standard or stock suspension possibly is the worst thing that any one can do as they put way more stress on the CV joints in IFS vehicles (hilux, navara etc). if you put these blocks and decide to do some off roading then you are asking for trouble as the struts themselves can break, not to mention the CV joint wear is exaggerated and seriously reduces the life on these joints. the best bet of lifting your vehicle is suspension lift and the body lift (which is a hell of a lot of work) and the safest height to lift without getting into too much modifications is about 2-2.5 inches max. anything beyond that is asking for all sorts of extensions on things like steering linkages etc...JUST MY $0.02 so dont bash meh 8-)

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Re: Everything you need to know about: Lifting your truck

Postby lighthammer » June 29th, 2011, 6:54 pm

^^ no, you making sense man.

2.5inches is the maximum you should lift your truck if you plan to keep it stock.

Coil Spacers shouldn't exceed 40mm, beyond this height will cause extra wear on the CV joints, as jpec pointed out in the post above.

If you plan to lift the truck higher than 3-inches, then it's highly, highly recommended that you get some extended diff-arms or dropped arms, so that the stock arms don't have to reach all the way down in order to articulate with the tyre (and cause more wear). Also, other things like the brake lines will have to be extended, the fuel tank spout will ahve to be extended (betcha didn't think about this, huh?) cuz the tank is bolted to the chasis and not the body, the radiator shroud would have to be relocated... and so on.

Best to leave that up to the professionals if you gonna go higher than 2.5 inches or 50mm.

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Re: Everything you need to know about: Lifting your truck

Postby sliderz1 » June 29th, 2011, 7:27 pm

jpec wrote:idk if half of yall know this but putting coil spacers on standard or stock suspension possibly is the worst thing that any one can do as they put way more stress on the CV joints in IFS vehicles (hilux, navara etc). if you put these blocks and decide to do some off roading then you are asking for trouble as the struts themselves can break, not to mention the CV joint wear is exaggerated and seriously reduces the life on these joints. the best bet of lifting your vehicle is suspension lift and the body lift (which is a hell of a lot of work) and the safest height to lift without getting into too much modifications is about 2-2.5 inches max. anything beyond that is asking for all sorts of extensions on things like steering linkages etc...JUST MY $0.02 so dont bash meh 8-)


dat is about max tolerance on stock suspensions where cambering is concerend anyway, any more and the full works will be required, arms, shocks, fluid and sensor lines, and what you mentioned...........



lighthammer wrote:If you plan to lift the truck higher than 3-inches, then it's highly, highly recommended that you get some extended diff-arms or dropped arms, so that the stock arms don't have to reach all the way down in order to articulate with the tyre (and cause more wear). Also, other things like the brake lines will have to be extended, the fuel tank spout will ahve to be extended (betcha didn't think about this, huh?) cuz the tank is bolted to the chasis and not the body, the radiator shroud would have to be relocated... and so on.

Best to leave that up to the professionals if you gonna go higher than 2.5 inches or 50mm.


i'm personally not into body lifts becuz your chassis is still vulnerable sorry leo :(

decent first post tho jpec

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Re: Everything you need to know about: Lifting your truck

Postby lighthammer » June 30th, 2011, 6:39 am

^^ i prefer a suspension lift myself.

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Re: Everything you need to know about: Lifting your truck

Postby droppa » June 30th, 2011, 9:56 am

to build a decent daily driver project, 4" of lift will quite suffice, bigger tires, ground clearance ans so on..., 2"BL and 2"SL will work in most cases with minimal modifications and allow up to 33" tires to be fitted...

do tha research for ur truck and see what the guys out there have done and also recommend...

also remember how much u increase the ride by is how much more u hav to climb in by....

this is a favorite quote of mine, from a site i frequent..

"Lift as much as needed, but as little as possible"

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Re: Everything you need to know about: Lifting your truck

Postby sliderz1 » June 30th, 2011, 3:16 pm

droppa wrote:
"Lift as much as needed, but as little as possible"


agreed

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Re: Everything you need to know about: Lifting your truck

Postby jpec » June 30th, 2011, 7:44 pm

thanks sliderz1 and lighthammer 8-)...my preference and what i would recommend would be the 2inch suspension and 2 inch body cuz ur getting 4 inches height safely with little modifications on all other components such as steering linkages, fuel tank sprout like lighthammer mentioned and so on. and that is what im planning to do to my hilux right now...got the ironman suspension and gonna get a BL later down the road when my wallet gets a bit bigger lol...another thing too is most people assume that putting lifting blocks on ur stock suspension is a good idea when in truth and in fact it isnt IF you plan on going heavy off roading cuz they actually affect how the suspension operates (droop and up travel etc) and makes it a lame ass off roader...but it looks good :roll: but why do that when you can have looks and function..just my opinion at least..to each their own.. 8-)

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Re: Everything you need to know about: Lifting your truck

Postby sliderz1 » June 30th, 2011, 8:02 pm

jpec wrote:thanks sliderz1 and lighthammer 8-)...my preference and what i would recommend would be the 2inch suspension and 2 inch body cuz ur getting 4 inches height safely with little modifications on all other components such as steering linkages, fuel tank sprout like lighthammer mentioned and so on. and that is what im planning to do to my hilux right now...got the ironman suspension and gonna get a BL later down the road when my wallet gets a bit bigger lol...another thing too is most people assume that putting lifting blocks on ur stock suspension is a good idea when in truth and in fact it isnt IF you plan on going heavy off roading cuz they actually affect how the suspension operates (droop and up travel etc) and makes it a lame ass off roader...but it looks good :roll: but why do that when you can have looks and function..just my opinion at least..to each their own.. 8-)


lowering the entire strut by spacer does not compromise upward or downward travel of the front wheels, or am i missing something here??

Looking forward to your post project pics dude!!!!!!!!! post em!' !!!!!! :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

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