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Property Tax in Trinidad & Tobago

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Re: Property Tax in Trinidad & Tobago

Postby Duane 3NE 2NR » September 23rd, 2021, 11:48 am

anyone feeling this?

Property tax: the economic booster Trinidad and Tobago needs

The government’s property tax could be the booster shot this economy needs.

I understand that sounds absurd. No one likes taxes. When you’re living in a country with widespread waste and graft, an instinctive willingness to raise the pitchforks against the taxman is even more understandable.

After all, surely higher taxes should discourage economic activity, not the other way around? And most times they do.

But this property tax is different.

The narrative so far, even from its supporters, is that the property tax is a necessary evil in order to buttress public finances during a downturn and pay for local services.

For its opponents, a tax is an affront, given the economic ravages of covid19.

What both sides are missing is that this could be a positive economic boost.

Context is necessary. A whole generation of investors has experienced 20 years of consistently rising property rises, artificially buoyed by oil and gas money. When growth tanked, along with the 2015 energy price crash, property prices held stable.

A large part of this is because there is very little cost to sitting on idle property. It is seen as an inflation hedge that is unlikely to decline very much in value.

The result – a significant over-investment in property. But that over-investment has not resulted in lower prices – because most owners just sit on their property, rather than sell or lower rents. The market therefore remains stagnant, and hundreds of millions if not billions are trapped in unproductive uses.

Just before 2015, a horde of businesspeople invested in gated-property developments in the $3-$4 million range. Many of these continue to sit idle – out of reach for young people. Most owners don’t even care if they don’t collect rent.

This has contributed to stagnation and decline in a developing economy that is in desperate need of productive, foreign-exchange-earning assets. Raising capital for a new business or an export-producing idea is that much harder when you’re competing against a property as an asset.

The property tax can change this. By imposing a cost on idle property owners will be incentivised to hustle either to sell or rent their property. In the first place, this will largely result in lower rents and prices for young people.

Crucially though, more people will start to look for alternative investments, such as private equity or local stocks or bonds. With mortgage-backed lending slightly less attractive, banks will equally be nudged towards lending to non-property investments, helping to unlock some of the $8 billion they had in excess cash reserves as of June 2021. The result could be an increase in economic activity.

By jolting investors and banks out of their risk-averse stupor, it can move the frontier of what people may consider investing in. Suddenly your niece’s environmentally-friendly packaging company or your nephew’s friend’s tech start-up looks more interesting.

Our mutual funds, brokerages, publicly traded companies, and others should take this as a new opportunity to roll out new investment options, and to deploy capital in more interesting forms of private equity.

Businesses need to get ready to be investible. Risk aversion isn’t entirely to blame. Deal-flow is just as much of a problem. Too many entrepreneurs still fail to demonstrate the potential of well-defined addressable markets, or even to present decent projections.

It is not just start-ups. Managers and owners should dust off their capital expansion plans. We should have thousands of investor-friendly businesses with pitch decks at the ready, preparing to scale.

Our economic system, from our overvalued currency to our antiquated labour laws to our forests of red tape, is designed to keep us from taking risks. Hemingway wrote that one goes bankrupt: “gradually, and then suddenly”. Risk aversion is the luxury of the financially secure – which TT is not.

Too often we attack our political system for rewarding populism. This tax is hardly that. It is in fact almost universally unpopular – which is why it has been treated as a hot potato, tossed from one party to the other.

But tax like this is good news for our political system. When more people are directly paying taxes, it will make us even less forgiving of poor execution, infrastructure, or governance. This is a policy that will strengthen our longer-term institutions. Young people should celebrate that.

We need to start taking more measured, calculated business risks that play to our strengths in strong export industries. The property tax can be the nudge we need to get moving.

Kiran Mathur Mohammed is an economist and co-founder of medl, an IDB Lab and Microsoft-backed social impact health tech company. Send feedback to kmmpub@gmail.com. 

https://newsday.co.tt/2021/09/23/proper ... bago-needs

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Re: Property Tax in Trinidad & Tobago

Postby Dizzy28 » September 23rd, 2021, 12:05 pm

Lots of assumptions there but to me the kicker is -
"But tax like this is good news for our political system. When more people are directly paying taxes, it will make us even less forgiving of poor execution, infrastructure, or governance. This is a policy that will strengthen our longer-term institutions. Young people should celebrate that."

This assume our voting population is nuanced which they show time and time again they are not. Even here on these forums we see it in the political threads.

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Re: Property Tax in Trinidad & Tobago

Postby wing » September 23rd, 2021, 12:17 pm

Dizzy28 wrote:Lots of assumptions there but to me the kicker is -
"But tax like this is good news for our political system. When more people are directly paying taxes, it will make us even less forgiving of poor execution, infrastructure, or governance. This is a policy that will strengthen our longer-term institutions. Young people should celebrate that."

This assume our voting population is nuanced which they show time and time again they are not. Even here on these forums we see it in the political threads.
Red government hack? Yellow opposition victim? I wonder where the tuner intelligence elite will put him?

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Re: Property Tax in Trinidad & Tobago

Postby Redman » September 23rd, 2021, 12:21 pm

Someone who can afford not receiving 100% of the rent, cant afford a 2.97% tax on the ARV?

Dont make sense.

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Re: Property Tax in Trinidad & Tobago

Postby Dizzy28 » September 23rd, 2021, 12:25 pm

wing wrote:
Dizzy28 wrote:Lots of assumptions there but to me the kicker is -
"But tax like this is good news for our political system. When more people are directly paying taxes, it will make us even less forgiving of poor execution, infrastructure, or governance. This is a policy that will strengthen our longer-term institutions. Young people should celebrate that."

This assume our voting population is nuanced which they show time and time again they are not. Even here on these forums we see it in the political threads.
Red government hack? Yellow opposition victim? I wonder where the tuner intelligence elite will put him?


I'm waiting to see when Lord Rader jumps in.

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Re: Property Tax in Trinidad & Tobago

Postby zoom rader » September 23rd, 2021, 12:43 pm

Duane 3NE 2NR wrote:anyone feeling this?

Property tax: the economic booster Trinidad and Tobago needs

The government’s property tax could be the booster shot this economy needs.

I understand that sounds absurd. No one likes taxes. When you’re living in a country with widespread waste and graft, an instinctive willingness to raise the pitchforks against the taxman is even more understandable.

After all, surely higher taxes should discourage economic activity, not the other way around? And most times they do.

But this property tax is different.

The narrative so far, even from its supporters, is that the property tax is a necessary evil in order to buttress public finances during a downturn and pay for local services.

For its opponents, a tax is an affront, given the economic ravages of covid19.

What both sides are missing is that this could be a positive economic boost.

Context is necessary. A whole generation of investors has experienced 20 years of consistently rising property rises, artificially buoyed by oil and gas money. When growth tanked, along with the 2015 energy price crash, property prices held stable.

A large part of this is because there is very little cost to sitting on idle property. It is seen as an inflation hedge that is unlikely to decline very much in value.

The result – a significant over-investment in property. But that over-investment has not resulted in lower prices – because most owners just sit on their property, rather than sell or lower rents. The market therefore remains stagnant, and hundreds of millions if not billions are trapped in unproductive uses.

Just before 2015, a horde of businesspeople invested in gated-property developments in the $3-$4 million range. Many of these continue to sit idle – out of reach for young people. Most owners don’t even care if they don’t collect rent.

This has contributed to stagnation and decline in a developing economy that is in desperate need of productive, foreign-exchange-earning assets. Raising capital for a new business or an export-producing idea is that much harder when you’re competing against a property as an asset.

The property tax can change this. By imposing a cost on idle property owners will be incentivised to hustle either to sell or rent their property. In the first place, this will largely result in lower rents and prices for young people.

Crucially though, more people will start to look for alternative investments, such as private equity or local stocks or bonds. With mortgage-backed lending slightly less attractive, banks will equally be nudged towards lending to non-property investments, helping to unlock some of the $8 billion they had in excess cash reserves as of June 2021. The result could be an increase in economic activity.

By jolting investors and banks out of their risk-averse stupor, it can move the frontier of what people may consider investing in. Suddenly your niece’s environmentally-friendly packaging company or your nephew’s friend’s tech start-up looks more interesting.

Our mutual funds, brokerages, publicly traded companies, and others should take this as a new opportunity to roll out new investment options, and to deploy capital in more interesting forms of private equity.

Businesses need to get ready to be investible. Risk aversion isn’t entirely to blame. Deal-flow is just as much of a problem. Too many entrepreneurs still fail to demonstrate the potential of well-defined addressable markets, or even to present decent projections.

It is not just start-ups. Managers and owners should dust off their capital expansion plans. We should have thousands of investor-friendly businesses with pitch decks at the ready, preparing to scale.

Our economic system, from our overvalued currency to our antiquated labour laws to our forests of red tape, is designed to keep us from taking risks. Hemingway wrote that one goes bankrupt: “gradually, and then suddenly”. Risk aversion is the luxury of the financially secure – which TT is not.

Too often we attack our political system for rewarding populism. This tax is hardly that. It is in fact almost universally unpopular – which is why it has been treated as a hot potato, tossed from one party to the other.

But tax like this is good news for our political system. When more people are directly paying taxes, it will make us even less forgiving of poor execution, infrastructure, or governance. This is a policy that will strengthen our longer-term institutions. Young people should celebrate that.

We need to start taking more measured, calculated business risks that play to our strengths in strong export industries. The property tax can be the nudge we need to get moving.

Kiran Mathur Mohammed is an economist and co-founder of medl, an IDB Lab and Microsoft-backed social impact health tech company. Send feedback to kmmpub@gmail.com. 

https://newsday.co.tt/2021/09/23/proper ... bago-needs
Written by a red government idiot

Kiran Mathur Mohammed

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Re: Property Tax in Trinidad & Tobago

Postby wing » September 23rd, 2021, 12:56 pm

zoom rader wrote:
Duane 3NE 2NR wrote:anyone feeling this?

Property tax: the economic booster Trinidad and Tobago needs

The government’s property tax could be the booster shot this economy needs.

I understand that sounds absurd. No one likes taxes. When you’re living in a country with widespread waste and graft, an instinctive willingness to raise the pitchforks against the taxman is even more understandable.

After all, surely higher taxes should discourage economic activity, not the other way around? And most times they do.

But this property tax is different.

The narrative so far, even from its supporters, is that the property tax is a necessary evil in order to buttress public finances during a downturn and pay for local services.

For its opponents, a tax is an affront, given the economic ravages of covid19.

What both sides are missing is that this could be a positive economic boost.

Context is necessary. A whole generation of investors has experienced 20 years of consistently rising property rises, artificially buoyed by oil and gas money. When growth tanked, along with the 2015 energy price crash, property prices held stable.

A large part of this is because there is very little cost to sitting on idle property. It is seen as an inflation hedge that is unlikely to decline very much in value.

The result – a significant over-investment in property. But that over-investment has not resulted in lower prices – because most owners just sit on their property, rather than sell or lower rents. The market therefore remains stagnant, and hundreds of millions if not billions are trapped in unproductive uses.

Just before 2015, a horde of businesspeople invested in gated-property developments in the $3-$4 million range. Many of these continue to sit idle – out of reach for young people. Most owners don’t even care if they don’t collect rent.

This has contributed to stagnation and decline in a developing economy that is in desperate need of productive, foreign-exchange-earning assets. Raising capital for a new business or an export-producing idea is that much harder when you’re competing against a property as an asset.

The property tax can change this. By imposing a cost on idle property owners will be incentivised to hustle either to sell or rent their property. In the first place, this will largely result in lower rents and prices for young people.

Crucially though, more people will start to look for alternative investments, such as private equity or local stocks or bonds. With mortgage-backed lending slightly less attractive, banks will equally be nudged towards lending to non-property investments, helping to unlock some of the $8 billion they had in excess cash reserves as of June 2021. The result could be an increase in economic activity.

By jolting investors and banks out of their risk-averse stupor, it can move the frontier of what people may consider investing in. Suddenly your niece’s environmentally-friendly packaging company or your nephew’s friend’s tech start-up looks more interesting.

Our mutual funds, brokerages, publicly traded companies, and others should take this as a new opportunity to roll out new investment options, and to deploy capital in more interesting forms of private equity.

Businesses need to get ready to be investible. Risk aversion isn’t entirely to blame. Deal-flow is just as much of a problem. Too many entrepreneurs still fail to demonstrate the potential of well-defined addressable markets, or even to present decent projections.

It is not just start-ups. Managers and owners should dust off their capital expansion plans. We should have thousands of investor-friendly businesses with pitch decks at the ready, preparing to scale.

Our economic system, from our overvalued currency to our antiquated labour laws to our forests of red tape, is designed to keep us from taking risks. Hemingway wrote that one goes bankrupt: “gradually, and then suddenly”. Risk aversion is the luxury of the financially secure – which TT is not.

Too often we attack our political system for rewarding populism. This tax is hardly that. It is in fact almost universally unpopular – which is why it has been treated as a hot potato, tossed from one party to the other.

But tax like this is good news for our political system. When more people are directly paying taxes, it will make us even less forgiving of poor execution, infrastructure, or governance. This is a policy that will strengthen our longer-term institutions. Young people should celebrate that.

We need to start taking more measured, calculated business risks that play to our strengths in strong export industries. The property tax can be the nudge we need to get moving.

Kiran Mathur Mohammed is an economist and co-founder of medl, an IDB Lab and Microsoft-backed social impact health tech company. Send feedback to kmmpub@gmail.com. 

https://newsday.co.tt/2021/09/23/proper ... bago-needs
Written by a red government idiot

Kiran Mathur Mohammed
The alpha has spoken.....awaits acolytes, stragglers and rival wannabe alphas.

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Re: Property Tax in Trinidad & Tobago

Postby teems1 » September 23rd, 2021, 2:16 pm

Nobody has problems paying a tax if and only if they see value for their money.

Right now they collect more than enough. If they trim the fat, end corruption, nepotism, kickbacks etc. They'll have more than enough to run the country.

Fix your leaking bucket before asking for more water.

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Re: Property Tax in Trinidad & Tobago

Postby VexXx Dogg » September 23rd, 2021, 2:31 pm

teems1 wrote:Nobody has problems paying a tax if and only if they see value for their money.

Right now they collect more than enough. If they trim the fat, end corruption, nepotism, kickbacks etc. They'll have more than enough to run the country.

Fix your leaking bucket before asking for more water.


I like this analogy.

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Re: Property Tax in Trinidad & Tobago

Postby zoom rader » September 23rd, 2021, 2:48 pm

VexXx Dogg wrote:
teems1 wrote:Nobody has problems paying a tax if and only if they see value for their money.

Right now they collect more than enough. If they trim the fat, end corruption, nepotism, kickbacks etc. They'll have more than enough to run the country.

Fix your leaking bucket before asking for more water.


I like this analogy.


They not fixing dog

That pothole in front your driveaway will rename as it

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Re: Property Tax in Trinidad & Tobago

Postby sam1978 » September 23rd, 2021, 7:46 pm

teems1 wrote:Nobody has problems paying a tax if and only if they see value for their money.

Right now they collect more than enough. If they trim the fat, end corruption, nepotism, kickbacks etc. They'll have more than enough to run the country.

Fix your leaking bucket before asking for more water.


Why fix the bucket when they could keep filling it from the taxpayers pipe?

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Re: Property Tax in Trinidad & Tobago

Postby 88sins » September 23rd, 2021, 9:00 pm

Duane 3NE 2NR wrote:anyone feeling this?

Property tax: the economic booster Trinidad and Tobago needs

The government’s property tax could be the booster shot this economy needs.

I understand that sounds absurd. No one likes taxes. When you’re living in a country with widespread waste and graft, an instinctive willingness to raise the pitchforks against the taxman is even more understandable.

After all, surely higher taxes should discourage economic activity, not the other way around? And most times they do.

But this property tax is different.

The narrative so far, even from its supporters, is that the property tax is a necessary evil in order to buttress public finances during a downturn and pay for local services.

For its opponents, a tax is an affront, given the economic ravages of covid19.

What both sides are missing is that this could be a positive economic boost.

Context is necessary. A whole generation of investors has experienced 20 years of consistently rising property rises, artificially buoyed by oil and gas money. When growth tanked, along with the 2015 energy price crash, property prices held stable.

A large part of this is because there is very little cost to sitting on idle property. It is seen as an inflation hedge that is unlikely to decline very much in value.

The result – a significant over-investment in property. But that over-investment has not resulted in lower prices – because most owners just sit on their property, rather than sell or lower rents. The market therefore remains stagnant, and hundreds of millions if not billions are trapped in unproductive uses.

Just before 2015, a horde of businesspeople invested in gated-property developments in the $3-$4 million range. Many of these continue to sit idle – out of reach for young people. Most owners don’t even care if they don’t collect rent.

This has contributed to stagnation and decline in a developing economy that is in desperate need of productive, foreign-exchange-earning assets. Raising capital for a new business or an export-producing idea is that much harder when you’re competing against a property as an asset.

The property tax can change this. By imposing a cost on idle property owners will be incentivised to hustle either to sell or rent their property. In the first place, this will largely result in lower rents and prices for young people.

Crucially though, more people will start to look for alternative investments, such as private equity or local stocks or bonds. With mortgage-backed lending slightly less attractive, banks will equally be nudged towards lending to non-property investments, helping to unlock some of the $8 billion they had in excess cash reserves as of June 2021. The result could be an increase in economic activity.

By jolting investors and banks out of their risk-averse stupor, it can move the frontier of what people may consider investing in. Suddenly your niece’s environmentally-friendly packaging company or your nephew’s friend’s tech start-up looks more interesting.

Our mutual funds, brokerages, publicly traded companies, and others should take this as a new opportunity to roll out new investment options, and to deploy capital in more interesting forms of private equity.

Businesses need to get ready to be investible. Risk aversion isn’t entirely to blame. Deal-flow is just as much of a problem. Too many entrepreneurs still fail to demonstrate the potential of well-defined addressable markets, or even to present decent projections.

It is not just start-ups. Managers and owners should dust off their capital expansion plans. We should have thousands of investor-friendly businesses with pitch decks at the ready, preparing to scale.

Our economic system, from our overvalued currency to our antiquated labour laws to our forests of red tape, is designed to keep us from taking risks. Hemingway wrote that one goes bankrupt: “gradually, and then suddenly”. Risk aversion is the luxury of the financially secure – which TT is not.

Too often we attack our political system for rewarding populism. This tax is hardly that. It is in fact almost universally unpopular – which is why it has been treated as a hot potato, tossed from one party to the other.

But tax like this is good news for our political system. When more people are directly paying taxes, it will make us even less forgiving of poor execution, infrastructure, or governance. This is a policy that will strengthen our longer-term institutions. Young people should celebrate that.

We need to start taking more measured, calculated business risks that play to our strengths in strong export industries. The property tax can be the nudge we need to get moving.

Kiran Mathur Mohammed is an economist and co-founder of medl, an IDB Lab and Microsoft-backed social impact health tech company. Send feedback to kmmpub@gmail.com. 

https://newsday.co.tt/2021/09/23/proper ... bago-needs

This has to be the most jackass utterance ever made in the entire history of the English language.

So, say I pay 4M for a property, and renting it out for 6K/m, but can't find tenants to occupy it, but I cool with it remaining unoccupied.
But because of increased property taxes, I will lower my rent rate to allow a younger probably more irresponsible person that may eventually not be able to pay my reduced rent in a timely and consistent manner long term, just so I can get some money to pay the increased property tax? Or I go sell it for a loss just to get away from having to pay the property tax? And that is how they plan to stimulate economic growth and movement?


Anyway, in case allyuh didn't know
Politicians and their minions live by a motto, "if yuh can't blind them with brilliance, baffle them with bull$#!t".
Please note, politicians aren't known for their brilliance.

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Re: Property Tax in Trinidad & Tobago

Postby RBphoto » September 23rd, 2021, 9:33 pm

88sins wrote:
Duane 3NE 2NR wrote:anyone feeling this?

Property tax: the economic booster Trinidad and Tobago needs

The government’s property tax could be the booster shot this economy needs.

I understand that sounds absurd. No one likes taxes. When you’re living in a country with widespread waste and graft, an instinctive willingness to raise the pitchforks against the taxman is even more understandable.

After all, surely higher taxes should discourage economic activity, not the other way around? And most times they do.

But this property tax is different.

The narrative so far, even from its supporters, is that the property tax is a necessary evil in order to buttress public finances during a downturn and pay for local services.

For its opponents, a tax is an affront, given the economic ravages of covid19.

What both sides are missing is that this could be a positive economic boost.

Context is necessary. A whole generation of investors has experienced 20 years of consistently rising property rises, artificially buoyed by oil and gas money. When growth tanked, along with the 2015 energy price crash, property prices held stable.

A large part of this is because there is very little cost to sitting on idle property. It is seen as an inflation hedge that is unlikely to decline very much in value.

The result – a significant over-investment in property. But that over-investment has not resulted in lower prices – because most owners just sit on their property, rather than sell or lower rents. The market therefore remains stagnant, and hundreds of millions if not billions are trapped in unproductive uses.

Just before 2015, a horde of businesspeople invested in gated-property developments in the $3-$4 million range. Many of these continue to sit idle – out of reach for young people. Most owners don’t even care if they don’t collect rent.

This has contributed to stagnation and decline in a developing economy that is in desperate need of productive, foreign-exchange-earning assets. Raising capital for a new business or an export-producing idea is that much harder when you’re competing against a property as an asset.

The property tax can change this. By imposing a cost on idle property owners will be incentivised to hustle either to sell or rent their property. In the first place, this will largely result in lower rents and prices for young people.

Crucially though, more people will start to look for alternative investments, such as private equity or local stocks or bonds. With mortgage-backed lending slightly less attractive, banks will equally be nudged towards lending to non-property investments, helping to unlock some of the $8 billion they had in excess cash reserves as of June 2021. The result could be an increase in economic activity.

By jolting investors and banks out of their risk-averse stupor, it can move the frontier of what people may consider investing in. Suddenly your niece’s environmentally-friendly packaging company or your nephew’s friend’s tech start-up looks more interesting.

Our mutual funds, brokerages, publicly traded companies, and others should take this as a new opportunity to roll out new investment options, and to deploy capital in more interesting forms of private equity.

Businesses need to get ready to be investible. Risk aversion isn’t entirely to blame. Deal-flow is just as much of a problem. Too many entrepreneurs still fail to demonstrate the potential of well-defined addressable markets, or even to present decent projections.

It is not just start-ups. Managers and owners should dust off their capital expansion plans. We should have thousands of investor-friendly businesses with pitch decks at the ready, preparing to scale.

Our economic system, from our overvalued currency to our antiquated labour laws to our forests of red tape, is designed to keep us from taking risks. Hemingway wrote that one goes bankrupt: “gradually, and then suddenly”. Risk aversion is the luxury of the financially secure – which TT is not.

Too often we attack our political system for rewarding populism. This tax is hardly that. It is in fact almost universally unpopular – which is why it has been treated as a hot potato, tossed from one party to the other.

But tax like this is good news for our political system. When more people are directly paying taxes, it will make us even less forgiving of poor execution, infrastructure, or governance. This is a policy that will strengthen our longer-term institutions. Young people should celebrate that.

We need to start taking more measured, calculated business risks that play to our strengths in strong export industries. The property tax can be the nudge we need to get moving.

Kiran Mathur Mohammed is an economist and co-founder of medl, an IDB Lab and Microsoft-backed social impact health tech company. Send feedback to kmmpub@gmail.com. 

https://newsday.co.tt/2021/09/23/proper ... bago-needs

This has to be the most jackass utterance ever made in the entire history of the English language.

So, say I pay 4M for a property, and renting it out for 6K/m, but can't find tenants to occupy it, but I cool with it remaining unoccupied.
But because of increased property taxes, I will lower my rent rate to allow a younger probably more irresponsible person that may eventually not be able to pay my reduced rent in a timely and consistent manner long term, just so I can get some money to pay the increased property tax? Or I go sell it for a loss just to get away from having to pay the property tax? And that is how they plan to stimulate economic growth and movement?


Anyway, in case allyuh didn't know
Politicians and their minions live by a motto, "if yuh can't blind them with brilliance, baffle them with bull$#!t".
Please note, politicians aren't known for their brilliance.


The tax is not supposed to make sense. Everything this government does is a distraction from their massive corruption and ineptitude. Jhonny Seukeran strips the bills of clauses which requires special majority and then adds them back later. It's all about expanding powers of the the government by treachery.

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Re: Property Tax in Trinidad & Tobago

Postby De Dragon » September 25th, 2021, 12:07 am

^^^^Dbu Tuntsy, Colos and the rest of the LFD RFD PNM brigade say God JUHN Scarfy knows best

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Re: Property Tax in Trinidad & Tobago

Postby Redman » September 25th, 2021, 8:34 am

So yuh saying the crappy AG is able to outmaneuver the silk empowered UNC, to the point where he can slip clauses that require constitutional majority in to the bill after the simple majority vote.?

And it's only tuner that pick up on it.

Not the legal luminance that is the UNC
Not the independent bench
Not the Law Association.

Just tuner.

Sounds legit.
L
O
L

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Re: Property Tax in Trinidad & Tobago

Postby 88sins » September 25th, 2021, 8:52 am

Fanatics aren't very bright, and political fanatics are the dumbest type there is

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Re: Property Tax in Trinidad & Tobago

Postby Mmoney607 » September 26th, 2021, 9:08 am

Redman wrote:So yuh saying the crappy AG is able to outmaneuver the silk empowered UNC, to the point where he can slip clauses that require constitutional majority in to the bill after the simple majority vote.?

And it's only tuner that pick up on it.

Not the legal luminance that is the UNC
Not the independent bench
Not the Law Association.

Just tuner.

Sounds legit.
L
O
L


AL rawi cause this whole bacchanal with the PSC yet he no where to be found now.

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Re: Property Tax in Trinidad & Tobago

Postby Mmoney607 » September 26th, 2021, 9:13 am

88sins wrote:
Duane 3NE 2NR wrote:anyone feeling this?

Property tax: the economic booster Trinidad and Tobago needs

The government’s property tax could be the booster shot this economy needs.

I understand that sounds absurd. No one likes taxes. When you’re living in a country with widespread waste and graft, an instinctive willingness to raise the pitchforks against the taxman is even more understandable.

After all, surely higher taxes should discourage economic activity, not the other way around? And most times they do.

But this property tax is different.

The narrative so far, even from its supporters, is that the property tax is a necessary evil in order to buttress public finances during a downturn and pay for local services.

For its opponents, a tax is an affront, given the economic ravages of covid19.

What both sides are missing is that this could be a positive economic boost.

Context is necessary. A whole generation of investors has experienced 20 years of consistently rising property rises, artificially buoyed by oil and gas money. When growth tanked, along with the 2015 energy price crash, property prices held stable.

A large part of this is because there is very little cost to sitting on idle property. It is seen as an inflation hedge that is unlikely to decline very much in value.

The result – a significant over-investment in property. But that over-investment has not resulted in lower prices – because most owners just sit on their property, rather than sell or lower rents. The market therefore remains stagnant, and hundreds of millions if not billions are trapped in unproductive uses.

Just before 2015, a horde of businesspeople invested in gated-property developments in the $3-$4 million range. Many of these continue to sit idle – out of reach for young people. Most owners don’t even care if they don’t collect rent.

This has contributed to stagnation and decline in a developing economy that is in desperate need of productive, foreign-exchange-earning assets. Raising capital for a new business or an export-producing idea is that much harder when you’re competing against a property as an asset.

The property tax can change this. By imposing a cost on idle property owners will be incentivised to hustle either to sell or rent their property. In the first place, this will largely result in lower rents and prices for young people.

Crucially though, more people will start to look for alternative investments, such as private equity or local stocks or bonds. With mortgage-backed lending slightly less attractive, banks will equally be nudged towards lending to non-property investments, helping to unlock some of the $8 billion they had in excess cash reserves as of June 2021. The result could be an increase in economic activity.

By jolting investors and banks out of their risk-averse stupor, it can move the frontier of what people may consider investing in. Suddenly your niece’s environmentally-friendly packaging company or your nephew’s friend’s tech start-up looks more interesting.

Our mutual funds, brokerages, publicly traded companies, and others should take this as a new opportunity to roll out new investment options, and to deploy capital in more interesting forms of private equity.

Businesses need to get ready to be investible. Risk aversion isn’t entirely to blame. Deal-flow is just as much of a problem. Too many entrepreneurs still fail to demonstrate the potential of well-defined addressable markets, or even to present decent projections.

It is not just start-ups. Managers and owners should dust off their capital expansion plans. We should have thousands of investor-friendly businesses with pitch decks at the ready, preparing to scale.

Our economic system, from our overvalued currency to our antiquated labour laws to our forests of red tape, is designed to keep us from taking risks. Hemingway wrote that one goes bankrupt: “gradually, and then suddenly”. Risk aversion is the luxury of the financially secure – which TT is not.

Too often we attack our political system for rewarding populism. This tax is hardly that. It is in fact almost universally unpopular – which is why it has been treated as a hot potato, tossed from one party to the other.

But tax like this is good news for our political system. When more people are directly paying taxes, it will make us even less forgiving of poor execution, infrastructure, or governance. This is a policy that will strengthen our longer-term institutions. Young people should celebrate that.

We need to start taking more measured, calculated business risks that play to our strengths in strong export industries. The property tax can be the nudge we need to get moving.

Kiran Mathur Mohammed is an economist and co-founder of medl, an IDB Lab and Microsoft-backed social impact health tech company. Send feedback to kmmpub@gmail.com. 

https://newsday.co.tt/2021/09/23/proper ... bago-needs

This has to be the most jackass utterance ever made in the entire history of the English language.

So, say I pay 4M for a property, and renting it out for 6K/m, but can't find tenants to occupy it, but I cool with it remaining unoccupied.
But because of increased property taxes, I will lower my rent rate to allow a younger probably more irresponsible person that may eventually not be able to pay my reduced rent in a timely and consistent manner long term, just so I can get some money to pay the increased property tax? Or I go sell it for a loss just to get away from having to pay the property tax? And that is how they plan to stimulate economic growth and movement?


Anyway, in case allyuh didn't know
Politicians and their minions live by a motto, "if yuh can't blind them with brilliance, baffle them with bull$#!t".
Please note, politicians aren't known for their brilliance.


But what's the point he trying to make about people just owning property but not doing anything with it? He trying to say that holding to property for the price to go up and then sell it?

Any right thinking person in this country should not want to pay any tax as long as Rowley is in power and is giving himself the power to do things like go to Australia with Stuart Young and buy two both with no proper Procurement procedure.

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Re: Property Tax in Trinidad & Tobago

Postby zoom rader » September 26th, 2021, 11:11 am

Mmoney607 wrote:
88sins wrote:
Duane 3NE 2NR wrote:anyone feeling this?

Property tax: the economic booster Trinidad and Tobago needs

The government’s property tax could be the booster shot this economy needs.

I understand that sounds absurd. No one likes taxes. When you’re living in a country with widespread waste and graft, an instinctive willingness to raise the pitchforks against the taxman is even more understandable.

After all, surely higher taxes should discourage economic activity, not the other way around? And most times they do.

But this property tax is different.

The narrative so far, even from its supporters, is that the property tax is a necessary evil in order to buttress public finances during a downturn and pay for local services.

For its opponents, a tax is an affront, given the economic ravages of covid19.

What both sides are missing is that this could be a positive economic boost.

Context is necessary. A whole generation of investors has experienced 20 years of consistently rising property rises, artificially buoyed by oil and gas money. When growth tanked, along with the 2015 energy price crash, property prices held stable.

A large part of this is because there is very little cost to sitting on idle property. It is seen as an inflation hedge that is unlikely to decline very much in value.

The result – a significant over-investment in property. But that over-investment has not resulted in lower prices – because most owners just sit on their property, rather than sell or lower rents. The market therefore remains stagnant, and hundreds of millions if not billions are trapped in unproductive uses.

Just before 2015, a horde of businesspeople invested in gated-property developments in the $3-$4 million range. Many of these continue to sit idle – out of reach for young people. Most owners don’t even care if they don’t collect rent.

This has contributed to stagnation and decline in a developing economy that is in desperate need of productive, foreign-exchange-earning assets. Raising capital for a new business or an export-producing idea is that much harder when you’re competing against a property as an asset.

The property tax can change this. By imposing a cost on idle property owners will be incentivised to hustle either to sell or rent their property. In the first place, this will largely result in lower rents and prices for young people.

Crucially though, more people will start to look for alternative investments, such as private equity or local stocks or bonds. With mortgage-backed lending slightly less attractive, banks will equally be nudged towards lending to non-property investments, helping to unlock some of the $8 billion they had in excess cash reserves as of June 2021. The result could be an increase in economic activity.

By jolting investors and banks out of their risk-averse stupor, it can move the frontier of what people may consider investing in. Suddenly your niece’s environmentally-friendly packaging company or your nephew’s friend’s tech start-up looks more interesting.

Our mutual funds, brokerages, publicly traded companies, and others should take this as a new opportunity to roll out new investment options, and to deploy capital in more interesting forms of private equity.

Businesses need to get ready to be investible. Risk aversion isn’t entirely to blame. Deal-flow is just as much of a problem. Too many entrepreneurs still fail to demonstrate the potential of well-defined addressable markets, or even to present decent projections.

It is not just start-ups. Managers and owners should dust off their capital expansion plans. We should have thousands of investor-friendly businesses with pitch decks at the ready, preparing to scale.

Our economic system, from our overvalued currency to our antiquated labour laws to our forests of red tape, is designed to keep us from taking risks. Hemingway wrote that one goes bankrupt: “gradually, and then suddenly”. Risk aversion is the luxury of the financially secure – which TT is not.

Too often we attack our political system for rewarding populism. This tax is hardly that. It is in fact almost universally unpopular – which is why it has been treated as a hot potato, tossed from one party to the other.

But tax like this is good news for our political system. When more people are directly paying taxes, it will make us even less forgiving of poor execution, infrastructure, or governance. This is a policy that will strengthen our longer-term institutions. Young people should celebrate that.

We need to start taking more measured, calculated business risks that play to our strengths in strong export industries. The property tax can be the nudge we need to get moving.

Kiran Mathur Mohammed is an economist and co-founder of medl, an IDB Lab and Microsoft-backed social impact health tech company. Send feedback to kmmpub@gmail.com. 

https://newsday.co.tt/2021/09/23/proper ... bago-needs

This has to be the most jackass utterance ever made in the entire history of the English language.

So, say I pay 4M for a property, and renting it out for 6K/m, but can't find tenants to occupy it, but I cool with it remaining unoccupied.
But because of increased property taxes, I will lower my rent rate to allow a younger probably more irresponsible person that may eventually not be able to pay my reduced rent in a timely and consistent manner long term, just so I can get some money to pay the increased property tax? Or I go sell it for a loss just to get away from having to pay the property tax? And that is how they plan to stimulate economic growth and movement?


Anyway, in case allyuh didn't know
Politicians and their minions live by a motto, "if yuh can't blind them with brilliance, baffle them with bull$#!t".
Please note, politicians aren't known for their brilliance.


But what's the point he trying to make about people just owning property but not doing anything with it? He trying to say that holding to property for the price to go up and then sell it?

Any right thinking person in this country should not want to pay any tax as long as Rowley is in power and is giving himself the power to do things like go to Australia with Stuart Young and buy two both with no proper Procurement procedure.
The red government is not in favour of people especially injun people that own multiple estates .

This entire tax is racist and aimed at one group of people

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Re: Property Tax in Trinidad & Tobago

Postby 88sins » September 26th, 2021, 12:49 pm

Mmoney607 wrote:
88sins wrote:
Duane 3NE 2NR wrote:anyone feeling this?

Property tax: the economic booster Trinidad and Tobago needs

The government’s property tax could be the booster shot this economy needs.

I understand that sounds absurd. No one likes taxes. When you’re living in a country with widespread waste and graft, an instinctive willingness to raise the pitchforks against the taxman is even more understandable.

After all, surely higher taxes should discourage economic activity, not the other way around? And most times they do.

But this property tax is different.

The narrative so far, even from its supporters, is that the property tax is a necessary evil in order to buttress public finances during a downturn and pay for local services.

For its opponents, a tax is an affront, given the economic ravages of covid19.

What both sides are missing is that this could be a positive economic boost.

Context is necessary. A whole generation of investors has experienced 20 years of consistently rising property rises, artificially buoyed by oil and gas money. When growth tanked, along with the 2015 energy price crash, property prices held stable.

A large part of this is because there is very little cost to sitting on idle property. It is seen as an inflation hedge that is unlikely to decline very much in value.

The result – a significant over-investment in property. But that over-investment has not resulted in lower prices – because most owners just sit on their property, rather than sell or lower rents. The market therefore remains stagnant, and hundreds of millions if not billions are trapped in unproductive uses.

Just before 2015, a horde of businesspeople invested in gated-property developments in the $3-$4 million range. Many of these continue to sit idle – out of reach for young people. Most owners don’t even care if they don’t collect rent.

This has contributed to stagnation and decline in a developing economy that is in desperate need of productive, foreign-exchange-earning assets. Raising capital for a new business or an export-producing idea is that much harder when you’re competing against a property as an asset.

The property tax can change this. By imposing a cost on idle property owners will be incentivised to hustle either to sell or rent their property. In the first place, this will largely result in lower rents and prices for young people.

Crucially though, more people will start to look for alternative investments, such as private equity or local stocks or bonds. With mortgage-backed lending slightly less attractive, banks will equally be nudged towards lending to non-property investments, helping to unlock some of the $8 billion they had in excess cash reserves as of June 2021. The result could be an increase in economic activity.

By jolting investors and banks out of their risk-averse stupor, it can move the frontier of what people may consider investing in. Suddenly your niece’s environmentally-friendly packaging company or your nephew’s friend’s tech start-up looks more interesting.

Our mutual funds, brokerages, publicly traded companies, and others should take this as a new opportunity to roll out new investment options, and to deploy capital in more interesting forms of private equity.

Businesses need to get ready to be investible. Risk aversion isn’t entirely to blame. Deal-flow is just as much of a problem. Too many entrepreneurs still fail to demonstrate the potential of well-defined addressable markets, or even to present decent projections.

It is not just start-ups. Managers and owners should dust off their capital expansion plans. We should have thousands of investor-friendly businesses with pitch decks at the ready, preparing to scale.

Our economic system, from our overvalued currency to our antiquated labour laws to our forests of red tape, is designed to keep us from taking risks. Hemingway wrote that one goes bankrupt: “gradually, and then suddenly”. Risk aversion is the luxury of the financially secure – which TT is not.

Too often we attack our political system for rewarding populism. This tax is hardly that. It is in fact almost universally unpopular – which is why it has been treated as a hot potato, tossed from one party to the other.

But tax like this is good news for our political system. When more people are directly paying taxes, it will make us even less forgiving of poor execution, infrastructure, or governance. This is a policy that will strengthen our longer-term institutions. Young people should celebrate that.

We need to start taking more measured, calculated business risks that play to our strengths in strong export industries. The property tax can be the nudge we need to get moving.

Kiran Mathur Mohammed is an economist and co-founder of medl, an IDB Lab and Microsoft-backed social impact health tech company. Send feedback to kmmpub@gmail.com. 

https://newsday.co.tt/2021/09/23/proper ... bago-needs

This has to be the most jackass utterance ever made in the entire history of the English language.

So, say I pay 4M for a property, and renting it out for 6K/m, but can't find tenants to occupy it, but I cool with it remaining unoccupied.
But because of increased property taxes, I will lower my rent rate to allow a younger probably more irresponsible person that may eventually not be able to pay my reduced rent in a timely and consistent manner long term, just so I can get some money to pay the increased property tax? Or I go sell it for a loss just to get away from having to pay the property tax? And that is how they plan to stimulate economic growth and movement?


Anyway, in case allyuh didn't know
Politicians and their minions live by a motto, "if yuh can't blind them with brilliance, baffle them with bull$#!t".
Please note, politicians aren't known for their brilliance.

But what's the point he trying to make about people just owning property but not doing anything with it? He trying to say that holding to property for the price to go up and then sell it?

Any right thinking person in this country should not want to pay any tax as long as Rowley is in power and is giving himself the power to do things like go to Australia with Stuart Young and buy two both with no proper Procurement procedure.

That jackass talks about "encouraging investment", and have no idea of what an "investment" looks like.

Who remembers when Toolumhead say property tax would be at the minimum "about the same price as a zaboca"?
Heads up, the minimum property tax is $48.60/month, or roughly $583/year. Almost NOBODY going to have to pay that little outside of people who live in some kinda plywood shack in sea lots. So I done seeing, me in my 4 br 2 storey with pump andac, by the photos of the outside alone they go hit me a arv of 6-7k/month minimum, so I expect my tax would be about at minimum $2300/year, so i will be paying nearly $200/month, to live in a house I already paid for, and get nothing for my money

That is one hell of a zaboca

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Re: Property Tax in Trinidad & Tobago

Postby De Dragon » September 26th, 2021, 9:53 pm

Redman wrote:So yuh saying the crappy AG is able to outmaneuver the silk empowered UNC, to the point where he can slip clauses that require constitutional majority in to the bill after the simple majority vote.?

And it's only tuner that pick up on it.

Not the legal luminance that is the UNC
Not the independent bench
Not the Law Association.

Just tuner.

Sounds legit.
L
O
L

In your haste to glom Arse Wari's gonads, you seem to be over relying on the term outmaneuver.
Like his alleged children with guns, doing something that cannot be challenged, is not that

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Re: Property Tax in Trinidad & Tobago

Postby De Dragon » September 26th, 2021, 9:57 pm

Mmoney607 wrote:
88sins wrote:
Duane 3NE 2NR wrote:anyone feeling this?

Property tax: the economic booster Trinidad and Tobago needs

The government’s property tax could be the booster shot this economy needs.

I understand that sounds absurd. No one likes taxes. When you’re living in a country with widespread waste and graft, an instinctive willingness to raise the pitchforks against the taxman is even more understandable.

After all, surely higher taxes should discourage economic activity, not the other way around? And most times they do.

But this property tax is different.

The narrative so far, even from its supporters, is that the property tax is a necessary evil in order to buttress public finances during a downturn and pay for local services.

For its opponents, a tax is an affront, given the economic ravages of covid19.

What both sides are missing is that this could be a positive economic boost.

Context is necessary. A whole generation of investors has experienced 20 years of consistently rising property rises, artificially buoyed by oil and gas money. When growth tanked, along with the 2015 energy price crash, property prices held stable.

A large part of this is because there is very little cost to sitting on idle property. It is seen as an inflation hedge that is unlikely to decline very much in value.

The result – a significant over-investment in property. But that over-investment has not resulted in lower prices – because most owners just sit on their property, rather than sell or lower rents. The market therefore remains stagnant, and hundreds of millions if not billions are trapped in unproductive uses.

Just before 2015, a horde of businesspeople invested in gated-property developments in the $3-$4 million range. Many of these continue to sit idle – out of reach for young people. Most owners don’t even care if they don’t collect rent.

This has contributed to stagnation and decline in a developing economy that is in desperate need of productive, foreign-exchange-earning assets. Raising capital for a new business or an export-producing idea is that much harder when you’re competing against a property as an asset.

The property tax can change this. By imposing a cost on idle property owners will be incentivised to hustle either to sell or rent their property. In the first place, this will largely result in lower rents and prices for young people.

Crucially though, more people will start to look for alternative investments, such as private equity or local stocks or bonds. With mortgage-backed lending slightly less attractive, banks will equally be nudged towards lending to non-property investments, helping to unlock some of the $8 billion they had in excess cash reserves as of June 2021. The result could be an increase in economic activity.

By jolting investors and banks out of their risk-averse stupor, it can move the frontier of what people may consider investing in. Suddenly your niece’s environmentally-friendly packaging company or your nephew’s friend’s tech start-up looks more interesting.

Our mutual funds, brokerages, publicly traded companies, and others should take this as a new opportunity to roll out new investment options, and to deploy capital in more interesting forms of private equity.

Businesses need to get ready to be investible. Risk aversion isn’t entirely to blame. Deal-flow is just as much of a problem. Too many entrepreneurs still fail to demonstrate the potential of well-defined addressable markets, or even to present decent projections.

It is not just start-ups. Managers and owners should dust off their capital expansion plans. We should have thousands of investor-friendly businesses with pitch decks at the ready, preparing to scale.

Our economic system, from our overvalued currency to our antiquated labour laws to our forests of red tape, is designed to keep us from taking risks. Hemingway wrote that one goes bankrupt: “gradually, and then suddenly”. Risk aversion is the luxury of the financially secure – which TT is not.

Too often we attack our political system for rewarding populism. This tax is hardly that. It is in fact almost universally unpopular – which is why it has been treated as a hot potato, tossed from one party to the other.

But tax like this is good news for our political system. When more people are directly paying taxes, it will make us even less forgiving of poor execution, infrastructure, or governance. This is a policy that will strengthen our longer-term institutions. Young people should celebrate that.

We need to start taking more measured, calculated business risks that play to our strengths in strong export industries. The property tax can be the nudge we need to get moving.

Kiran Mathur Mohammed is an economist and co-founder of medl, an IDB Lab and Microsoft-backed social impact health tech company. Send feedback to kmmpub@gmail.com. 

https://newsday.co.tt/2021/09/23/proper ... bago-needs

This has to be the most jackass utterance ever made in the entire history of the English language.

So, say I pay 4M for a property, and renting it out for 6K/m, but can't find tenants to occupy it, but I cool with it remaining unoccupied.
But because of increased property taxes, I will lower my rent rate to allow a younger probably more irresponsible person that may eventually not be able to pay my reduced rent in a timely and consistent manner long term, just so I can get some money to pay the increased property tax? Or I go sell it for a loss just to get away from having to pay the property tax? And that is how they plan to stimulate economic growth and movement?


Anyway, in case allyuh didn't know
Politicians and their minions live by a motto, "if yuh can't blind them with brilliance, baffle them with bull$#!t".
Please note, politicians aren't known for their brilliance.


But what's the point he trying to make about people just owning property but not doing anything with it? He trying to say that holding to property for the price to go up and then sell it?

Any right thinking person in this country should not want to pay any tax as long as Rowley is in power and is giving himself the power to do things like go to Australia with Stuart Young and buy two both with no proper Procurement procedure.[/quote]
Caca Colos says that is outmaneuvering the Opposition :roll: . He so dotish that he considers that a win, even though his HDC rent will go up, but hey as long as the LFD RFD PNM triggering the UNC, iz okay ent?

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Re: Property Tax in Trinidad & Tobago

Postby Redman » September 27th, 2021, 6:41 am

Again with your made up tootz Dragon.
Blather on.

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Re: Property Tax in Trinidad & Tobago

Postby one eye » September 27th, 2021, 12:22 pm

Where is the evidence for money laundering and "thiefing" by government officials?

Why are there clean audit outcomes? They should have stumbled upon misuse by now.

If this government is so incompetent, inefficient and unable then UNC are dregs.

In their 5 year term they got busted on a number of corruption practices.

You can trace all that this government has done. If you dispute these facts you are no better than an antivaxxer.

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Re: Property Tax in Trinidad & Tobago

Postby Dizzy28 » September 27th, 2021, 12:23 pm

one eye wrote:Where is the evidence for money laundering and "thiefing" by government officials?

Why are there clean audit outcomes? They should have stumbled upon misuse by now.

If this government is so incompetent, inefficient and unable then UNC are dregs.

In their 5 year term they got busted on a number of corruption practices.

You can trace all that this government has done. If you dispute these facts you are no better than an antivaxxer.


ROFL!!!!

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Re: Property Tax in Trinidad & Tobago

Postby 88sins » September 27th, 2021, 1:38 pm

one eye wrote:Where is the evidence for money laundering and "thiefing" by government officials?

Why are there clean audit outcomes? They should have stumbled upon misuse by now.

If this government is so incompetent, inefficient and unable then UNC are dregs.

In their 5 year term they got busted on a number of corruption practices.

You can trace all that this government has done. If you dispute these facts you are no better than an antivaxxer.


another pnm fanatic, why does this not surprise me :roll:

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Re: Property Tax in Trinidad & Tobago

Postby De Dragon » September 27th, 2021, 11:42 pm

Redman wrote:Again with your made up tootz Dragon.
Blather on.

What's made up arse?
Didn't 7 year degree, children denier, Arse Wari amend the legislation to require a simple majority for passage? You're the the champion LFD RFD PNM when it comes to dotish blind following and hypocrisy

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Re: Property Tax in Trinidad & Tobago

Postby SuperiorMan » September 29th, 2021, 5:57 am

Really surprised that people just accepting this....no big protesting etc.
Last edited by SuperiorMan on September 29th, 2021, 6:07 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Property Tax in Trinidad & Tobago

Postby De Dragon » September 29th, 2021, 6:02 am

SuperiorMan wrote:Really surprised that people just accepting this....no bug protesting etc.

Illegal right now, and Geeyore isn't there to grant permission.

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Re: Property Tax in Trinidad & Tobago

Postby De Dragon » September 29th, 2021, 6:09 am

De Dragon wrote:
Redman wrote:Again with your made up tootz Dragon.
Blather on.

What's made up arse?
Didn't 7 year degree, children denier, Arse Wari amend the legislation to require a simple majority for passage? You're the the champion LFD RFD PNM when it comes to dotish blind following and hypocrisy

Even the President was moved from her normal slumber to comment on dotish arse Arse Wari's legislation :roll:
Trinidad Express, September 28th 2021
President Paula-Mae Weekes was “immediately concerned” about paragraph 4 of Legal Notice 183 under which Gary Griffith was appointed to act as top cop and communicated this in writing to chairman of the Police Service Commission (PolSC), Bliss Seepersad.
Yet one of the chief LFD RFD PNM ball blower Colos, talking sheit about "outmaneuvering"
Arse Wari couldn't maneuver his way out of a brown bag :lol:

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